Electric Guitar for a Child

The name says it all! Discuss Steve's studios, your studios and gear set-ups, amps and effects here. This is not for discussing guitars (Steve's or otherwise).
Stephen Brown
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Now for a diminished chord. :D :lol:
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Big Bad Bill
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I think classical guitar and contemporary electric guitar are as far removed from each other as a 1924 Model T Ford and a Porsche 911. On the surface they are similar, strings, fretboard, frets and they both make a sound, but that's about it. Would a 911 owner be a better driver if they started out on a Model T Ford? A moot point perhaps, but my main issue is that most modern kids are likely to continue playing electric guitar because its perceived as being cooler than classical guitar and maintaining enthusiasm for a playing a musical instrument when progress slows and even stops is 90% of the battle.

(My friend has gone with Ibanez Mikro and a Peavey Vypyr 15 Watt for his kid, by the way. Thanks for your suggestions)
Stephen Brown
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DomitianX
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guitarmanK1982 wrote:..And to conclude, i'd like to quote myself, in the very first post I made in this thread:

guitarmanK1982 wrote:The main reason to start on a classical guitar is to develop dynamic control of the instrument (e.g. control over the volume produced).

This isn't such an issue on the electric, as the amp controls the volume more than the actual fingers (yes, you can still be dynamic on an electric, but the range is far less).

So, beginning on a classical is better as one develops a greater physical control of the sound produced from the instrument.





However, if the kid/parents want to begin with an electric, then it is up to them. If a classical was forced on a child who had no interest in classical, then it could actually put them off music, never mind putting them off guitar.



DomitianX I ask you to read the final part of that quote.

I think you'll see that it is you who has tried to drag me into some sort of internet fight.

I had stated from the first post that I wasn't insistent on classical being the only way. I stated that it was the preferred way.


I think you should read the posts first before replying to someone.
Man you really dont get it. I am countering the fact you said in order to be technically competent you are required to use classical technique otherwise you will never be technically competent. Not about playing classical, not about electric guitars merely about classical technique being a requirement for technical proficiency. Which has been debunked.

Thats it. So stop already. I am not countering any other point you made. Only that single solitary statement.
Desert_Runner
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Well, all that anger from the watering hole had to go somewhere. :D
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boswell
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Big Bad Bill wrote:(My friend has gone with Ibanez Mikro and a Peavey Vypyr 15 Watt for his kid, by the way. Thanks for your suggestions)
Not be long before he pops round to uncle Bill's to plug into the 5150 and crank out Smoke on the Water with the master volume on 11 :lol:
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boswell
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Anyhow I think he should be forced to endure Classical Piano lessons for 15 years before being allowed near any new fangled electrickery guitars!
Desert_Runner
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John Petrucci learned on a violin. Never did him any harm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pJ1ccnC1GI
DomitianX
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[quote="Desert_Runner"]John Petrucci learned on a violin. Never did him any harm.

Thank god he didnt use classical techniques otherwise he would have become technically proficient and imploded the earth when he reached 600 bpm.
guitarmanK1982
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Good god people!

No one has yet said what 'classical techniques' are, yet everyone is saying that 'classical techniques' are not a part of/requirement of playing electric guitar.


How can the people here say this if they haven't explained what 'classical techniques' are?


And what makes the people here think the techniques are different? (rasgueado, apoyando, and tirando aside ;))


What makes the people here think that classical techniques aren't occasionally (sometimes unknowingly) used by the electric guitar tutor?



There is a big distinction being made here between classical techniques and electric techniques. But no-one has stated the difference.
Guitaruss
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guitarmanK1982 wrote:Good god people!

No one has yet said what 'classical techniques' are, yet everyone is saying that 'classical techniques' are not a part of/requirement of playing electric guitar.


How can the people here say this if they haven't explained what 'classical techniques' are?


And what makes the people here think the techniques are different? (rasgueado, apoyando, and tirando aside ;))


What makes the people here think that classical techniques aren't occasionally (sometimes unknowingly) used by the electric guitar tutor?



There is a big distinction being made here between classical techniques and electric techniques. But no-one has stated the difference.
What a gargantuan twat you are man !! Well done !!
DomitianX
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guitarmanK1982 wrote:Good god people!

No one has yet said what 'classical techniques' are, yet everyone is saying that 'classical techniques' are not a part of/requirement of playing electric guitar.


How can the people here say this if they haven't explained what 'classical techniques' are?


And what makes the people here think the techniques are different? (rasgueado, apoyando, and tirando aside ;))


What makes the people here think that classical techniques aren't occasionally (sometimes unknowingly) used by the electric guitar tutor?



There is a big distinction being made here between classical techniques and electric techniques. But no-one has stated the difference.
We dont have to say what they are because it seems most of us dont put rules on it. You can use any technique. Pool cue's, spatulas, small dogs, tire irons, rubber bands, whatever we want to play the guitar.

Use whatever technique can possibly think of to convey what you want using the guitar.

Simple. Who cares what they use. Point out ways they can do thing better, dont put ANY limits on what the student should do. Let them explore however they want, but with some guidance.

The worst thing you can do to stifle someone is to tell them they have to do things a certain way otherwise they will never be any good.
Stephen Brown
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I think guitar players can be the most argumentative types at times. It's sad because it can over shadow the grace of the instrument & what it means to people.

A world of a world within a world, in another world.

Not good if your just a beginner.
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notavirtuoso
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FRETPICK wrote:I think guitar players can be the most argumentative types at times. It's sad because it can over shadow the grace of the instrument & what it means to people.

A world of a world within a world, in another world.

Not good if your just a beginner.
I think it's like that with any group of people that are passionate about something. I've seen/experienced the same thing in forums dedicated to aquarium fish. If you really love something, then more than likely you have some pretty strong opinions about it.
Stephen Brown
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notavirtuoso wrote:
FRETPICK wrote:I think guitar players can be the most argumentative types at times. It's sad because it can over shadow the grace of the instrument & what it means to people.

A world of a world within a world, in another world.

Not good if your just a beginner.
I think it's like that with any group of people that are passionate about something. I've seen/experienced the same thing in forums dedicated to aquarium fish. If you really love something, then more than likely you have some pretty strong opinions about it.
No they don't. :lol: All jokes aside.

One thing that seems to be common in the professional people I respect is their ability of humblness, what ever the subject matter. It has had a great impact on me.

I guess what i'm trying to say is that if a pro has an opinion, they norm have a great way of summing things up. Based on their own experiences. You may agree or not, but it's the way they put it that is important. You can really learn from it.

One pro says: Yer man I took that electric & have been playing ever since.

Another pro says: I was a kid & I took guitar lessons from a teacher at school. Yep...He had & used an acoustic.

Satch Tapes: Steve turns up on door step, with a friend. Guitar in one hand, pack of strings in another.

Can't for the life of me remember if it was an electric or acoustic? Anyone know/have the VHS tape?
Last edited by Stephen Brown on Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:23 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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