sight reading...

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tim_knox
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sight reading...

#1 Post by tim_knox » Mon Apr 26, 2004 10:13 am

Hi guys,

This summer i am going to dedicate my time to sight-reading everything. But i was just wondering if anyone can give me some tips because i am finding that it is hard to tell where to start the peice or where to go considering there are many of the same notes in the same area. This is where tabs is useful but i really dont like them and i want to be able to sight read well, but im just getting confused on which octave to use, i guess if there is another pattern that is alright too. if you guys could give me some tips that would be great thanks!!

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#2 Post by davester1234 » Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:17 pm

well, the music will often specify what octave your in...ie. *8va means an octave up...

However, as you know, that g an octave up can be played in multiple places. If there is no position noted, then you'll have to use your instinct on how/where to play a passage...it helps to be able to look at the notes in a sequence, and to learn to look a bar or 2 ahead if possible. I know its tough, but that's one of the keys of sightreading.

If you notice in 3 bars your going to be playing very high notes, then its probably best to start working your way up.

You'll need to get to a point where you can judge where to play something just by the nature of the notes before and after where you are at that specific point.

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#3 Post by tim_knox » Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:29 pm

Ok so usually it will tell you what position?

Yah, looking ahead that is a good tip!

Ok. thanks for your help dave

Another question- When I write some stuff down, like solo type stuff and there are long crescendos that cover the fret board from a very low note to a very high note-how far are you supposed to extend the ledger lines or are you supposed to do what you said and just specify that it is an octave higher

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#4 Post by davester1234 » Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:43 pm

sometimes positions are given, not always.
:wink:
Sometimes the notes will read as it your in first position ie, the c note between the first and second line....but it still might say 8va, or specify two octaves up or whatever.

to be legible, leger lines usually only go so high, after a certain point, they become unreasonably high. Then you often see the 8va marker. But in transcribing stuff I've often gone as high as the high E on the 12 fret, sometimes higher. Depends on the type of manuscript paper, and what you want to do with it. Remember, writing notes is very artistic, it calls for taking matters into your own hands.

Just use your good judgement, and take a look at some existing manuscripts to see what you like/don't like. There really isn't a right or wrong, just practical and impractical. Theoretically, you could make leger lines go so high that they'll account for the high e on the 24th fret, but it would be pretty damn hard to count how many leger lines there are on the fly to know what note to hit. LOL!

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#5 Post by tim_knox » Mon Apr 26, 2004 5:00 pm

you mean the c between the third and fourth line :D

ok so if you are playing around the first position and then make a long run up to the 12 position. Would you recommend starting back on the original staff or? That is why im finding it hard to decide which octave to play. i dont know. thank you

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#6 Post by davester1234 » Mon Apr 26, 2004 7:45 pm

my bad!

its hard to say man, I can't really give you an answer... its always desirable to write the music as it actually translates to guitar, but if it gets uncomfortable looking, then you might want to consider 8va.

I don't know...its not usually a great idea to cut to an octave divide right in the middle of a run, it can confuse readers...if you are going to do it, it may be best to do it for whole phrases or runs. that's the best I can say. :)

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#7 Post by The Man With 1 Eye » Wed Apr 28, 2004 9:05 am

Tim,

I think the first thing to keep in mind is that guitar music is always written an octave higher than it sounds. For example the C at the first fret of the B string is actually middle C even though it is written on the third space of the treble clef staff.

To really get good at reading, I would recommend Berklee Press titles:

Modern Methodfor Guitar Vol. 1
Melodic Rhythms
Reading Studies and
Advanced reading studies.

These will help you read all twelve keys in every position. There is also a book by Arnie Berle called A New Approach to Sight Reading or something like that. This will help you break out of position playing when sight reading and help you think more horizontally across the neck.

Good luck. Being a good reader can land you lots of gigs.

1 Eye

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#8 Post by tim_knox » Wed Apr 28, 2004 9:29 am

thanks I will definitly get those books!!

can you explaing the first thing you said though about guitar music always written an octave lower. thanks man

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#9 Post by jmchambers5 » Wed Apr 28, 2004 11:39 am

okay, don't let it confuse you, but the guitar has been transposed up an octave to make it fit in the treble clef better. this doesn't affect anything as far as reading or anything like that, as long as you're reading for guitar, or bass for that matter. just keep in mind if you're reading a piano part or something though, you'll have to play the notes up an octave from where you would normally play them on guitar.

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#10 Post by tim_knox » Wed Apr 28, 2004 11:54 am

Why would the part on the treble clef on piano music need to be played an octave up from where i would play it, or is it because the first positions are where people usually play something and since guitar is usually only written in treble clef these first position areas are reserved for the very low notes that would usually go on the bass clef of a piano piece? let me know if that is the reasoning for the octave higher thing.

Because this is the only way i can think thatit could work because your saying an octave higher than you would usually play it but there are soo many places that you can play it so which octave?

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#11 Post by The Man With 1 Eye » Fri Apr 30, 2004 5:59 am

Hi Tim,

Guitar music is written an octave higher than it sounds just so it all fits on one treble clef staff. The range of the guitar covers the grand staff like piano does. The low E string is actually one leger line below the bass clef staff. The 24th fret of the high E string is the E three leger lines above the treble clef staff.

If the notation was just written how it sounds on the treble clef staff, without transposing, the open low E string would be seven leger lines below the staff... very confusing. So the standard is to write the notation an octave higher than it sounds. now the open low E is written at the space below the third leger line below the treble clef staff.

I think you are on the right track in thinking that the lowest notes on guitar are the notes that would be written in bass clef on piano.

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#12 Post by tim_knox » Fri Apr 30, 2004 10:25 am

wwwoooo ok wow this is a lot more complicated than I thought. Ok so If it is written an octave higher so it can fit on the treble clef, how does that leave room for big runs, I hope you know what i mean. Like a long run on a solo that spans the whole neck, although you are going from low strings near the nut to high strings near the pickups, how are you supposed to write that? AHHH

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#13 Post by The Man With 1 Eye » Fri Apr 30, 2004 10:53 am

If the run started with the low E, start writing at the space below the third leger line. Then, just continue up. Once you are in the higher register you can use leger lines above the staff or start notating an octave lower with 8va-------- notated. I would start this on 1 of a new measure.

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#14 Post by tim_knox » Fri Apr 30, 2004 12:10 pm

ok I gotcha, thanks!!!

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