chord changes

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chook01
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anyone heard of authentic and plagal chord changes.apparantly there's six chord changes three are authentic and three are plagal,the authentic ones are 1)second up 2)third down 3)fourth up and the plagal ones are 1)2nd down 2)third up 3)fourth down.if you want to go a third down upwards just make it add up to nine, so a third down is also a sixth up,you end up on the same chord and so on for the others,i read a bit about this recently and it got me thinking that there's more to writing music than just random selection of chords then add some arpeggio's and notes from the major scale,i think it comes from classical but thats where most stuff comes from anyway and a lot of the guitar players i like, if i dig around enough would probably find out that they have had some form of professional or formal music training which would include classical techniques so there must be something in it.this may also apply to melody and how you move away from and back to chord tones.there's 1)passing notes within the scale 2)auxillary note or neighbour note 3)suspension note 4)retardation note 5)anticipation note 6)appoggiatura.just wondering if anyone knows anything about this as i found it intriguing and might source out some more info on it.
aaronm
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chook01
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cheers,thats good,i'm gonna read more about this.
Dyens
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Simply put, a perfect authentic cadence is a V chord resolving to a I or i chord that is in root inversion and with the root note also voiced in the soprano part.

A plagal cadence happens after the final perfect authentic cadence in a piece. You may know it from church as the little tag at the end of an intonated chant where everyone sings "Amen". It is a IV chord resolving to a I chord. This is pretty much the only instance in common practice music where a IV chord resolves to a I chord.
johnbowman
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Very interesting . . . esp the wipedia link . . you can spend hours and hours on this stuff . . . :guitar
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chook01
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Yeah you can.Lets take an example of The Unforgiven.I believe its an A minor chord in the intro and the melody line is A B C C B A etc so i guess that this is an example of the passing tone technique and in this case the passing tone is B.And i use this an an example because i believe James Hetfield has done classical stuff before.Interesting.
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