Chords

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the power of bombos
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Chords

#1 Post by the power of bombos » Thu Jan 31, 2008 6:41 am

How important is it to learn every chord? It just seems that there are so many and then there are many different ways to voice the chords. Does it get easier to learn new chords quickly after a while? Also, when I read about the Modes nobody ever says which type of chords go best with a particular mode. I'm not really into writing music but I do enjoy free playing. Is there a really good way to have fun learning chords? Usually I just run through different shapes in an exercisey kind of way (the same boring way to practice scales). Actually while on the subject of scales are there any fun ways to learn them as well and also to practice them?

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#2 Post by pagliai » Thu Jan 31, 2008 7:14 am

well you can take a drum machine and then you take a chord or a series of chords and you can impro a rythm in every style ,funky rock blues metal ,or you can compose a song or a riff,or if you 've got a recorder you can play a solo with a drum machine and you can create the harmony and chords under the solo....or.....or or or ....

another good things is to write out a song of vai or joe or others,so you can analyze it and learn the voicings.

or......mh .....

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#3 Post by Guitaruss » Thu Jan 31, 2008 7:24 am

Good question !
I too am trying to find fun ways of learning chords/notes/scales/(everything) !

the best way to start learning chords i guess is the CAGED system whereby you take the open position chords and make them movable up and down the neck...start with plain major and minors then DOM7th, major7th,minor7th etc

after that i guess its learning about intervals and 11th 13th and 9th shapes

if you know the intervals then you should be able to identify chords more easily and make up some of your own voiceings..after a while things start to make more sense


heres a chord sequence i'm learning at the moment that uses alot of 7th shapes in the key of C (no sharps or flats!) ,the sequence moves in a cycle of 4ths..


Dm7-G7-Cmaj7-Fmaj7-Bmflat7-Em7-Am7-Am7-back to Dm7 etc

So the idea is to play each chord for 1 bar using different shapes/positions each time

Its not exactly fun but its a start !

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Re: Chords

#4 Post by -SkiZ- » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:49 am

the power of bombos wrote:Is there a really good way to have fun learning chords?
compose stuff

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Big Bad Bill
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#5 Post by Big Bad Bill » Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:56 pm

Take some guitar grade exams and you'll learn all the chords you ever need in a rock context. I'd recommend the RGT exams.

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#6 Post by PNicholson_RGT » Thu Jan 31, 2008 2:24 pm

Big Bad Bill wrote:Take some guitar grade exams and you'll learn all the chords you ever need in a rock context. I'd recommend the RGT exams.
I second that. RGT exams are very well structured and a great way of learning.

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#7 Post by guitarmanK1982 » Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:07 pm

Quit, if the hard work puts you off.

A musician understands the hard work involved is necessary in order to reach the desired results, just as the athlete has to train in order to achieve his best.

It only gets more difficult, the better you want to be, as more committment is required.

If practising scales is a problem, then you won't last long, or won't reach a very high level.

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Re: Chords

#8 Post by Svelt Pen » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:43 pm

the power of bombos wrote:How important is it to learn every chord? It just seems that there are so many and then there are many different ways to voice the chords. Does it get easier to learn new chords quickly after a while? Also, when I read about the Modes nobody ever says which type of chords go best with a particular mode. I'm not really into writing music but I do enjoy free playing. Is there a really good way to have fun learning chords? Usually I just run through different shapes in an exercisey kind of way (the same boring way to practice scales). Actually while on the subject of scales are there any fun ways to learn them as well and also to practice them?
It depends on what kind of music you want to create.If you are only into metal, then you probably shouldn't waste your time learning extended jazzy chords. If you are into Satriani, Vai, Holdsworth, or any players that play fancy chords, and you want to play in that style, then you will have to learn MANY chords...If you want to learn about chord construction, modes and scales, check out this series of articles at ibreathemusic.com, as well as the forums. The guys there are VERY knowledgeable and a lot of the articles contain powertabs, mp3's and pdf's.:

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/105

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/106

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/108

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/147

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/153

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#9 Post by Svelt Pen » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:55 pm

guitarmanK1982 wrote:Quit, if the hard work puts you off.

A musician understands the hard work involved is necessary in order to reach the desired results, just as the athlete has to train in order to achieve his best.

It only gets more difficult, the better you want to be, as more committment is required.

If practising scales is a problem, then you won't last long, or won't reach a very high level.
I have to disagree about the necessity of practicing scales. I'm not saying don't practice them, but just remember that they are not the be all-end all of progression on the guitar. Guys like Eddie Van Halen, Dave Mustaine, and a lot of other famous musicians who have made it big never studied scales or music theory.They did, however, spend an enormous amount of time honing their skills, and you can't expect to get anywhere near that level without 1: jamming with other musicians and 2: consistent, focused practice . If you just take a few minutes to identify your goals, then structure a practice schedule around those goals and stick to it. If things get boring, or if you feel you've mastered what you've put into your practice schedule, then it's time to move on and create a new one. Don't forget to give yourself time at the end of practice solely for noodling, jamming to CD's, creating new licks etc...Ear training is something you should definitely pay attention to, if nothing else...Pick a random melody or sound and try to emulate it on your guitar. Sing scales while you play them to solidify the musical connection between your brain and your fingers. Trust me, this stuff works...if you are willing to focus and put in the time and hard work. The payoffs will be more than worth it. :)

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#10 Post by leigh01 » Sat Feb 02, 2008 9:06 am

PNicholson_RGT wrote:
Big Bad Bill wrote:Take some guitar grade exams and you'll learn all the chords you ever need in a rock context. I'd recommend the RGT exams.
I second that. RGT exams are very well structured and a great way of learning.
I third the motion!
plus you get a cool looking certificate at the end of it. unless you fail.

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#11 Post by Dyens » Sat Feb 02, 2008 5:36 pm

If you only look at charts that show you "shapes" then you won't ever learn anything. What you need to do is learn the theory behind chord construction and then learn the fingerboard. That way, you'll be able to see the best voice leading and all of the inverstions and things that go into a chord progression. If you just learn shapes then you'll be very limited.

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#12 Post by alexleviathan » Sat Feb 09, 2008 4:18 am

PNicholson_RGT wrote:
Big Bad Bill wrote:Take some guitar grade exams and you'll learn all the chords you ever need in a rock context. I'd recommend the RGT exams.
I second that. RGT exams are very well structured and a great way of learning.
I also think that the rgt exams are worthwhile i am on grade 7 at the moment

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