Most Innovative Eddie Van Halen songs

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atifman
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In one of the other Van Halen threads (i think it was the one where everybody was arguing), i remember reading a while ago where someone posted a list of EVH songs and why they were creative and such a breakthrough, saying things like, "no one used this technique, but he did blablabla" for each song.
i told myself i'd check out those songs (that the guy mentioned) later.

so later, i tried looking for it, but i couldn't find the post; i looked all over the forum, using different search queries.

So i thought i'd start this thread:


Besides Eruption, what are some songs by Eddie that you think are breakthroughs, and why?
Iav Oris Evets
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You might mean me. I quickly posted this without thinking too much actually. I will post a better one later. I posted it in that Rolling Stone Top 100 guitarists of all time thread...(Eddie Van Halen should be #1 not #70)...Almost every EVH song had something innovative in it when you look at them all. He even created new chord triad stuff in songs that I had never seen before...



nobody was doing 2 handed triplet classical sounding tapping like the end of Eruption
nobody was playing harmoincs like in the intro to Women In Love or intro to Mean Streets
nobody was using the Whammy Bar like eddie in solos.
nobody was tremolo picking like the classical bit in Eruption or the solo in Everybody Wants Some
nobody tapped harmonic like the intro to Spanish Fly
nobody was doing string scrapes like Eddie on the intro to And The Cradle Will Rock
nobody was doing single string tremolo's on 1 string while tapping a melody on another like the acoustic intro to Little Guitars
single handedly saved the guitar from electronic extinction in the 80's
voted best rock guitar player by fans in hundreds of magazines and polls worldwide for over 15 years (1980 - 1995)
badhorsie551
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Im a huge VH nut! Heres some of my personal favorites with EVH writing excellent songs!

Dreams
Summer Nights
Why Cant This Be Love
Cant Get This Stuff No More
I'm The One
Feel Your Love Tonight
Somebody Get Me A Doctor
Beautiful Girls
Unchained
Cant Stop Loving You
Love Walks In
5150!!!!!!


and a ton more, EVH rules. :D
Zebula77
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The intro to Mean Streets is totally unique. I've never heard anyone play like that before or after him. It's just awesome. :shock: :D
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Mr. Canadian
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Here is an interesting read..


Van Halen is often regarded as the inventor of the popular two-handed tapping technique, but it was actually used several earlier players. Jazz great Tal Farlow was known to have used artifical harmonics in the 1950's, a technique which also required the positioning of the picking hand over the neck (listen to Eddie's harmonic tapping on "Dance the Night Away" for a similar example) and during the 1970s, Larry Carlton, Allan Holdsworth, Frank Zappa, and ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons both played one-note tapping licks in their solos (listen to Carlton use it in Steely Dan's "Kid Charlemagne", Holdsworth in Bruford's "Abingdon Chasp", Zappa in "Inca Roads", and Gibbons in "Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers"). For more appreggiated tapped approach a la "Eruption", funk fusioneer Harvey Mandel and Genesis' Steve Hackett based a good part of their individual styles on that technique during the same period.

Similar precedents hold true for Van Halen's tremolo bars work. Jimi Hendrix was an ardent user of the multi-octave whammy drops, but due to technical limitations of the Fender Stratocaster's tremolo unit, few guitarists after Hendrix did similar effects with the device for the fear of putting their guitar out of tune or breaking a string. Jeff Beck ("Goin Down"), Ritchie Blackmore ("Smoke On The Water"), and Joe Walsh (The James Gang's "Walk Away") were also know whammy abusers. However, with the advent of the clamping tremolo units like the popular Floyd Rose and Kahler systems, as well as Eddie Van Halen's own tremolo spring set-up, the whammy bar sound was brought to new levels of popularity, and soon almost evey rock guitarist was buying a guitar with a locking tremolo or having one installed on their current axe (whammy fever eventually even spread to bass players, albeit with dismal results).

The use of scalar hammer-ons isn't without a history of its own, particularly amoung classical players. Within a rock context, an excellent early example of fast hammering work can be heard in Randy California's fluid fuzz lines for "Street Worm", a segment of Spirit's pop suite for 1970's 'The Twelve Dreams Of Dr. Sardonicus'. Even better are Bill Nelson's extremely smooth hammer-ons in the ballad "Adventures In A Yorkshire Landscape" and other tracks from Be-bop Deluxe's great 'Live in the Air Age' record of 1977, which appeared just a few months before Van Halen hit the streets. Finally, Allan Holdsworth's legato work in the late 70's with U.K. and Bruford was a major influence on Van Halen, as he readily admitted in several interviews. So while Eddie Van Halen didn't invent any of his famous techniques, his greatness nonetheless lies in the fact that he was able to synthesize them into one staggering style. Other players may have come up with these lick separately, but Van Halen is the one who fused them together and promptly blew the guitar world away.

[taken from 'Guitar', January, 1997 pgs. 44-45]

Seasons Greetings.
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Radio Ga Ga
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...I think Beat it (M.Jackson) is the most complete solo of EVH...a full compound of his amazing :shock: tecnique....
guitar_love
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i agree with the micheal jackson solo....that solo is amazin!!!!!
Oveja Negra
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Well, it depends when did you listen his music.

I listened "seriously" Steve Vai before EVH. So when I paid attention on his solos (EVH I mean), It was like: Ehhh, hmmm.. yeah, he is good, I guess :roll:

No offense to EVH and/or his fans, but the way EVH uses the guitar in his music is too simple and boring <-- IMHO of course ;)

Saludoskis :shock:
cam-89
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If it wasn't for Eddie Van Halen single handedly reinventing the guitar, there would be no Vai, Satch, Malmsteen, Petrucci, Nuno, and a lot of other players. Don't get me wrong, I'm a huge fan of all the players I just mentioned, but before these guys did anything, Eddie did everything. Eddie is also the ultimate riff writer. Vai might be able to phisically outplay him, but Eddie would throw something back that would blow his head off!
Ibanezwizard
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Hi,

I think EVH is great because he is an amazing guitar player who sits in very well as part of a band. It always seems that Vai was destined to have his own band.

Everyone out there owes a lot to EVH but im not actually a huge fan. The greatest hits 1 and live: right here, right now are enough to satisfy me.

BTW: My favourite song is actually "Dance the night away" :lol:

Mark
The Prez
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Most innovative song, definally Eruption!
Tom
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Breakthrough songs... Hmm... the whole body of Van Halen's guitar work up through, I'd say, 5150 is innovative. Not that he wasn't ever "innovative" after 5150, but, I'd go with the first seven albums. Individual songs, though:

"Beat It" is a hugely important song I think, and although I'm no historian or music biz expert, I think it's probably true that the "rock respectability" that song (and video) brought Michael Jackson -- and the R&B flavor he in turn brought to rock-oriented AOR (and to MTV) -- marked a turning point in American pop music. I can still hear Kasey Kasum on "American Top 40," talking over the first minute and a half of that record, going on about the heavy-metal guitarist EVH, Valerie's newish husband, doing the solo. And the solo is truly phenomenal. (And I've read about Eddie's influence over the arrangement of that song, too.)

There are numerous technical breakthroughs already mentioned... I think that the aggressive whammy-bar stuff on the "Mean Street" outtro solo is one more element, obviously in addition to the intro, that makes that song pretty innovative.

"Little Guitars" (plus intro) is also a pretty special song, lyrical, exotic, energetic, fun, and -- interestingly -- the heavy guitar is used so effectively not on a flashy solo but on rhythm stuff: opening bass riff, accentual chords and pick slides. One of my favorite VH tunes. There's this chord he hits near the beginning, after the acoustic intro and after the riff with drums, just before the peppy main figure starts...he's got the flange on, just kills me every time.
Tom
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Breakthrough songs... Hmm... the whole body of Van Halen's guitar work up through, I'd say, 5150 is innovative. Not that he wasn't ever "innovative" after 5150, but, I'd go with the first seven albums. Individual songs, though:

"Beat It" is a hugely important song I think, and although I'm no historian or music biz expert, I think it's probably true that the "rock respectability" that song (and video) brought Michael Jackson -- and the R&B flavor he in turn brought to rock-oriented AOR (and to MTV) -- marked a turning point in American pop music. I can still hear Kasey Kasum on "American Top 40," talking over the first minute and a half of that record, going on about the heavy-metal guitarist EVH, Valerie's newish husband, doing the solo. And the solo is truly phenomenal. (And I've read about Eddie's influence over the arrangement of that song, too.)

There are numerous technical breakthroughs already mentioned... I think that the aggressive whammy-bar stuff on the "Mean Street" outtro solo is one more element, obviously in addition to the intro, that makes that song pretty innovative.

"Little Guitars" (plus intro) is also a pretty special song, lyrical, exotic, energetic, fun, and -- interestingly -- the heavy guitar is used so effectively not on a flashy solo but on rhythm stuff: opening bass riff, accentual chords and pick slides. One of my favorite VH tunes. There's this chord he hits near the beginning, after the acoustic intro and after the riff with drums, just before the peppy main figure starts...he's got the flange on, just kills me every time.
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Ekim
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EVH's best song is that instrumental after Alex's solo on Balance. Baluchethurium or something like that. It's so heavy and massive, but has a great melody. I know a lot of VH fans don't like the newer stuff, but that song encapsulates so much of his talents, it's silly.
GYPCMAN
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It's called "a place in time" and unless you were there, you really don't understand. Someone posted, they heard Vai 1st...and he didn't think VH was all that.

I was there and playing guitar. The kings to me was Nuge, Page, Blackmore and Lifeson. When I heard VH on the radio I just went wow. But!! When I brought the album home I said Son Of a B****!!!!!! The tech blew me away but what really freaked my S*** was the sound. How in the hell is he gettin that sound?

Who ever did all that stuff before Ed was great but he brought it out and basically told all of us 1o year old guitarist that this is possible for you.

Then I heard DiMeola but that's another story.
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