Andres Segovia

For discussion of all general music topics, Favored Nations artists, Vai-related musicians and all other artists and bands.
The Prez
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He's supposity the greatest classical guitarist ever, and gave lessons to John WIlliams. Is he worth lsitining to?
greg
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HELL YES!
jmchambers5
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John Williams, hehe Try Christopher Parkening.

As for Segovia being great, his greatness transcends classical guitar. He is probably the single most important figure in the history of the guitar. Before Segovia came along, guitar was a third class folk instrument, like the dulcimer or mandolin or something. Segovia singlehandedly elevated the guitar to a position of respect. If it weren't for Segovia, odds are we'd all be playing rock and roll violin or something.
Picabo
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Speaking about classical guitar, everyone should listen to Eliot Fisk playing Paganini's 24 Caprices. Unbelievable!
Arpeggio
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jmchambers5 wrote:John Williams, hehe Try Christopher Parkening.

As for Segovia being great, his greatness transcends classical guitar. He is probably the single most important figure in the history of the guitar. Before Segovia came along, guitar was a third class folk instrument, like the dulcimer or mandolin or something. Segovia singlehandedly elevated the guitar to a position of respect. If it weren't for Segovia, odds are we'd all be playing rock and roll violin or something.
How come I have never heard of his name in respect to the growth of the guitar.

I always hear other peoples names such as pag. I know pag didn't play guitar, but he was still very influential in its popularity.

I never heard of this Segovia guy................when did he live.
jmchambers5
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He was alive in the early 1900s. He basically got the guitar respect as a classical instrument by performing and transcribing huge amounts of classical music for the guitar.

Paganini didn't have much to do with guitar directly, as it wasn't until later that his works were transcribed for guitar I believe. I dont even think he composed for guitar.

Segovia also inspired many composers to compose for the guitar, so much of the classical guitar reperotiore was either transcribed by or inspired by Segovia.

Soon after Segovia popularized the guitar as a classical instrument, jazz players took notice and started to replace the banjo with guitar as a rhythm instrument. Jazz players evolved in to others, until we get guitar as the incredibly diverse instrument as it is today. One of the beatles, i believe it was Paul McCartney, once said "Segovia is the father of us all"
Segovia was never a fan of rock and roll or electric guitar, so he responded by saying "They are illegitimate children"

The impact Segovia made on the guitar is much like the impact that the Wright brothers had on flying. The guitar and concept of flight had been around, but Segovia and the Wright brothers really kicked things off. Saying without Segovia there would be no rock and roll guitar is much like saying without the Wright brothers there would be no F-16 fighter jet.

I strongly recomend that everyone do a little research and gain a little insight on the Maestro Segovia, just as it is important to understand the heritage of the instrument. Christopher Parkening Celebrates Segovia is a great CD with lots of information about this topic. heres a dinky little article i found on the web about it
http://www.classicalguitar.net/artists/segovia/
Picabo
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jmchambers5 wrote:Paganini didn't have much to do with guitar directly, as it wasn't until later that his works were transcribed for guitar I believe. I dont even think he composed for guitar.
Paganini did compose some guitar & violin sonatas but the guitar serves more as an accompaniment. I've read that Paganini did play guitar very well.
shader
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What are some of his best songs?
Jackhammer
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I suggest getting 'The Segovia Collection' its a compilation of 4CD's of his stuff. I bought it for 80$

Cover looks like this : Image
Bohm
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Is it only me who find him quite boring after a while..? :roll: (plz don't kill me)´ :P
jmchambers5
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Nah, if classical guitar isn't your bag, then you'll find Segovia a little boring, because that's all he is. No guitar acrobatics or anything, just classical music.
Bohm
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Well, I do like classical music. But it sounds so stiff with only a acoustic guitar. Neoclassical is great and I love classical music wich involves piano and/or violin.

But when listening to Segovia I get nothing from it.. :roll:
Opus131
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Picabo wrote: Paganini did compose some guitar & violin sonatas but the guitar serves more as an accompaniment. I've read that Paganini did play guitar very well.
The fact is that guitar was never considered to be a serious instrument untill Segovia put it on the forefront.

Before that it was mostly a folk instrument, and Paganini was mostly a folk musician, deeply rooted in the italian musical tradition of the time, which was never considered 'serious' by it's own definition (galante).

'Serious' classical music as we know it stems mostly from the first Viennese school established by Haydn, that's why most of the greatest classical composers are German.

When Segovia started he was often urged to drop the guitar and learn a 'real' instrument, like the piano, or the violin. Apparently, he responted by making the guitar a real instrument.

BTW, i'm not very fond of classical guitar myself. Much of the music written for it is either transpositions of composition made for another instrument (which generally sound better the way it was intended) or it's music written by minor composers. All in all, i don't think classical guitar has really departed from it's original context that much, and never made for much of a solo instrument.

IMO, i think the Violin closely resembles what Electric Guitars are today than Classical Guitar ever did...
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Mr. Canadian
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Bohm wrote:Is it only me who find him quite boring after a while..? :roll: (plz don't kill me)´ :P
I find classical guitar REALLY boring too. It doesn't groove or anything. It's all rigid and stiff. Blah. Yawn.
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