LATEST NEWS!

Steve Vai and Tapiola Sinfonietta, Lauri Porra Flyover Ensamble

Helsinki Festival

Steve Vai (USA) w/ Tapiola Sinfonietta, Lauri Porra Flyover Ensemble
Monday 20.08.2018 klo 19:00
Huvila-teltta

Steve Vai is considered one of the best electric guitarists in the world – regardless of genre. Vai is known for his mind-blowing, fast and melodic solos and stylistically perfect guitar sound. He is also a showman through and through, whose gigs turn into fiery Events progressing with insane energy. Vai’s music melts progressive rock and metal into a red-hot euphoric mix.

During his long career, Vai has played with giants of rock ranging from Whitesnake and Ozzy Osbourne to Motörhead and Meat Loaf, won several Grammy Awards and sold over 15 million albums. Vai rose to fame in the late-1970s as a member of Frank Zappa’s band, which is likely the origin of his massive, genre-breaking ambition and inclination to think outside the box.

Lately Vai has been composing for various big bands and using classical orchestras. At Huvila Festival Tent, Vai is accompanied by a reinforced Tapiola Sinfonietta – the audience is in for a tent erupting with sound.

Th e evening’s opening act is a pioneer of modern progressive rock, Lauri Porra Flyover Ensemble. Headed by bassist-composer Porra, the band has cemented its place as one of the best live acts in Finland, receiving praise from both jazz and heavy metal enthusiasts.



US Generation Axe tour 2018

STEVE VAI, ZAKK WYLDE, YNGWIE MALMSTEEN, NUNO BETTENCOURT & TOSIN ABASI TO STAGE SECOND NORTH AMERICAN GENERATION AXE TOUR

32-Date Run Begins November 7 At The Fox Theater in Oakland, CA and Wraps December 18 At The Wiltern in Los Angeles, CA – General On-Sale Begins July 13

 

Los Angeles, CA — The term “supergroup” gets thrown around on a regular basis these days, however, GENERATION AXE undisputedly brings together some of the greatest guitarists of all time. Steve Vai, Zakk Wylde, Yngwie Malmsteen, Nuno Bettencourt, and Tosin Abisi once again will join together to tour North America to stage 32 appearances across the country. Beginning on November 7 at the Fox Theater in Oakland, CA, the run will return to markets where the inaugural tour was celebrated and hit several new cities for the first time. The general on-sale goes live July 13.

 

Steve Vai offers, “The Generation Axe show is a unique performance of five fiercely talented guitar players coming together to create a 6-string extravaganza that is sure to amaze and delight.” Each tour stop will include a variety of collaborations by the five players, including everyone performing together as one cohesive band with a rhythm section including Pete Griffin (Dweezil Zappa, Stanley Clarke, Edgar Winter) on bass, Nick Marinovich (Yngwie Malmsteen) on keys, and JP Bouvet on drums. Vai, Wylde, Malmsteen, Bettencourt and Abasi will perform songs from their various catalogs and join forces on some well-known songs (as well as probably a few unexpected, unearthed gems). Vai shares, “The Generation Axe experience goes way beyond simply gathering five guitar greats on one stage to jam. The idea was to create a seamless show with one backing band and 5 completely accomplished and astonishing guitarists that take to the stage in various configurations, performing some of their solo music and merging together as cohesive co-creators of lushly orchestrated guitar extravaganzas. Guitar Jams like this can get really messy when there is no organization and my idea was to create parts for everybody to play in harmony and off each other so it’s not a mess of noise. This worked out remarkably well. There are places where everyone is playing together in wild harmony.”

 

Making this rare tour experience even more special, Generation Axe VIP packages will be offered, giving fans access to these guitars masters and exclusive one-of-a-kind memorabilia. A front row package (including a meet & greet), a meet & greet package, and a VIP tour package will be available. For more information, visit www.generationaxe.com.

 

Many artists fit easily into a single category, while Steve Vai remains unclassifiable. He is a virtuoso guitarist, visionary composer, and consummate audio producer who sculpts musical sound with infinite creativity and technical mastery. He is one of the most in-demand, versatile, eloquent and soulful guitarists in the business. The GRAMMY Award-winner has sold over 15 million albums and toured the world as a solo artist, a member of G3, and with Frank Zappa, Alcatrazz, David Lee Roth, and Whitesnake. Vai launched his successful solo career with the release of Flex-Able in 1984 and has written, produced, and engineered all of his solo albums. He has appeared as a guest artist on more than 40 albums and created music for blockbuster films, best-selling video games, national sports franchises, and corporate brand initiatives. Vai has earned honorary doctorates from Berklee College of Music and Musicians Institute. For more info, visit: www.vai.com.

 

GRAMMY Award-winner Zakk Wylde’s legendary career includes a lengthy tenure with Ozzy Osbourne in which Wylde co-wrote and recorded several albums, including the multiplatinum No More Tears, Osbourne’s largest selling solo album featuring the classic hit single, “Mama, I’m Coming Home” and the bulk of the double platinum 2002 set, Ozzmosis. With Osbourne, Wylde has played on countless world tours and television appearances, with his signature bullseye Les Paul in tow. Wylde has his mitts imprinted on Hollywood’s Rock Walk of Fame; guest-starred alongside Mark Wahlberg and Jennifer Aniston in the movie “Rockstar”; and even momentarily joined Axl, Slash and Duff in Guns N’ Roses. But nothing offers the pure expression of Zakk Wylde’s animalistic “id” like Black Label Society, the stomping, heavy, bluesy, recklessly unhinged hard-rock-metal quartet who are quick to rip up a solo as to dip into a piano-fueled anthemic ballad. For more info, visit: www.zakkwylde.com.

When Yngwie J. Malmsteen hit the scene in the early 80s, he turned the entire guitar world upside down. Never before was guitar playing like his ever heard. Drawing inspiration from his love for Baroque and Romantic classical music, Malmsteen employs classical violin techniques such as four and five octave arpeggios, pedal notes, and harmonic minor, diminished and Phrygian scales, flawlessly delivered at mind-boggling levels of speed and clarity. In doing so, he has singlehandedly created a brand-new style of guitar playing and composing that is still derived from today. In addition to having written and produced 35+ neoclassical rock albums, Malmsteen composed and orchestrated the “Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra,” which he recorded with the prestigious Czech Philharmonic in Prague, conducted by Yoel Levy of Atlanta Symphony fame. Malmsteen subsequently performed the piece live with the New Japan Philharmonic and the Taipei Symphony, among others. Malmsteen has received numerous Grammy nominations, hundreds of magazine covers, dozens of Reader’s Poll and Composer of the Year Awards, a plaque on the Rock Walk of Fame, signature model guitars, amps, pickups, strings, picks, pedals, microphones, and more. TIME Magazine placed him as one of the top ten guitarists of all time. Some 35 years and 25 million+ album sales later, Yngwie shows no signs of slowing down. For more info, visit: www.yngwiemalmsteen.com.

 

Guitar virtuoso, singer-songwriter, and record producer, Nuno Bettencourt rose to international prominence as a guitar player with the GRAMMY-nominated, Boston-area band EXTREME, one of the most successful rock acts of the early to mid-1990s selling over 10 million records worldwide. Musically, EXTREME is dominated by Bettencourt’s blistering guitar riffs, often with funky, syncopated timing, and incendiary, high-speed rock/metal solos. Bettencourt penned the acoustic ballad “More Than Words” that went to #1 on the Billboard charts and “Hole Hearted” that reached #4. He has released multiple solo albums as well as with bands he founded including Mourning Widows Population 1, Dramagods and Satellite Party. Bettencourt has written, produced and performed with many legendary artists including Rihanna, Steven Tyler, Paul McCartney, Janet Jackson and many others. For more info: www.nunobettencourt.com.

 

Oluwatosin Ayoyinka Olumide Abasi, better known as Tosin Abasi, is a Nigerian American guitarist known as the guitar player and founder of the instrumental progressive metal band, Animals as Leaders. Abasi’s compositions of intricate music have garnered critical acclaim in a few short years. Abasi is part of the breed of new contemporary players who are raising the bar on the concept of electric guitar virtuosity. His approach to the guitar stems from a passion for advanced techniques and harmony. Using 7-, 8-, and 9-string guitars have allowed Abasi to create a highly unique and individual sound. For more info, visit: www.facebook.com/ animalsasleaders

Generation Axe – A Night of Guitars is produced by Copeland International Arts and is booked by CAA. For additional information visit: www.generationaxe.com.

 

Confirmed appearances include:

11/07            Oakland, CA                                                    Fox Theater

11/08            Anaheim, CA                                                   City National Grove

11/09            Las Vegas, NV                                                 The Joint at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

11/10            Tempe, AZ                                                        Marquee Theatre #

11/11            Albuquerque, NM                                            El Rey Theater

11/13            Denver, CO                                                       Paramount Theatre – Denver

11/15            Kansas City, MO                                              Uptown Theatre

11/16            Salina, KS                                                         The Stiefel Theatre

11/17            Tulsa, OK                                                          Brady Theater

11/18            Des Moines, IA                                                Hoyt Sherman Theatre

11/19            Cincinnati, OH                                                Taft Theatre

11/20            Grand Rapids, MI                                          20 Monroe Live

11/21            Detroit, MI                                                        Fillmore Detroit

11/23            Medford, MA                                                   The Chevalier Theater

11/24            Niagara Falls, NY                                           The Rapids Theatre

11/25            Kitchener, ON                                                 Centre in the Square

11/27            Bethlehem, PA                                                 Sands Bethlehem Event Center

11/28            Port Chester, NY                                             Capitol Theatre

11/29            Albany, NY                                                      The Palace Theatre

11/30            Atlantic City, NJ                                            Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Atlantic City – The Theater

12/01            Rochester, NY                                                Kodak Center for the Arts

12/03            Greensburg, PA                                             The Palace Theatre

12/04            Westbury, NY                                                NYCB Theatre at Westbury

12/05            Richmond, VA                                               The National

12/08            Atlanta, GA                                                    Tabernacle

12/09            Orlando, FL                                                   Hard Rock Live

12/10            Davie, FL                                                        Hard Rock Live at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

12/11            Clearwater, FL                                               Ruth Eckerd Hall

12/13            Austin, TX                                                       The Moody Theater

12/14            Dallas, TX                                                       The Bomb Factory

12/16            Salt Lake City, UT                                        The Complex – Rockwell

12/18            Los Angeles, CA                                            The Wiltern

# – Nuno Bettencourt not appearing

 

 

 



In Memory of Joe “Jem” Despagni

It is with a heavy heart that I announce that Joe “Jem” Despagni had passed away on Tuesday May 29, 2018 in his sleep.

Joe was not only an excellent luthier, he was a brilliantly creative, funny, considerate, and generous person. He was also perhaps my very best friend in this life. When we go through a loss like this, there’s an opportunity for the divine to shine through and I’ve been thinking about him constantly lately and as my mind and heart are filled with so many precious memories of our friendship, I feel great love and appreciation for him and the life we had together, and the amazing person he was. And of course, there’s the great pangs of loss. He will be profoundly missed by those who loved him.

Some of you may know about my relationship with Joe and a bit about him, but here’s a little more. 

I remember Joe Despagni being in my life as long as I can remember remembering. We lived a block away from each other and it seems like we were always in each other life. 

I’m still processing the loss and as I do I’m flooded with memories of our life together and I would like to share a few.

All the kids that grew up on my street were relatively well behaved, never got into trouble, never really did things we were not supposed to do, played sports, Monopoly, Risk, listened to music, etc. We were basically very simple. But two streets over was a completely different group of kids. They were good spirited but considered “greasers”, heavy metal rock and rollers, bikers, trouble makers, drinkers, smokers and drug takers. I split my time between the two groups and fit in well but was still a bit of a misfit in both groups. Joe was absolutely part of the greaser group and though he and I spent the most time together on our own, we would also hang out with our rocker friends and do things with them that greasy golden memories were made of.

Joe had a brother Rob and a sister Carmela. They were younger, and I really liked them. We were like family in a way. Joe’s Mom and Dad were good people. They were pure Long Island Italian as my family was and his Mom was such the sweetie. She would cook for us occasionally. His Dad was funny and warm and good to us kids. Coming from an Italian family I understand how the household dynamics work. From an outsider’s point of view, it could look as though there was a lot of bickering going on inside the home, but in reality, that’s just the way we communicated. The love in these Italian families runs deep and strong.

 

Joe owned the first guitar I ever played, a Hagstrom III and we would gather in his basement and take turns trying to figure it out. 

 

Joe and I spent most of our time together from the age of 12 to the time I left for Berklee college when I was 18. 

There’s no way to quantify the impact we had on each other’s lives. 

It’s a blessing to have a friend that you completely and utterly feel comfortable with, that you can share anything with because they understand you and don’t criticize you for anything. I’m fortunate in that I have had many friends like this in my youth and my life, but in those most formative teenage years, Joe was the closest.

 

Through those years we grew together and made all those discoveries you make as an adolescent such as, music, girls, cars, bikes, drugs, life, independence, etc. Joe and I would have deep talks about everything. There was nothing we couldn’t say to each other. I have recordings of some of it. He was always kind, considerate and generous with even the simple things he had, and we were laughing most of the time. It felt like we both had a totally bizarre sense of humor that only the two of us understood.

 

When I started to practice the guitar hours and hours in my bedroom, (age 13) Joe was there. Sometimes he would hang out while I practiced. Many hours were spent in the dark of the room playing chords for each other and telling the stories that those chords told us. Whenever I discovered a new riff on the guitar I was so excited to show it to Joe. We were both fascinated with what I could come up with after all the hours I was practicing, even if it was a rip off of a Hendrix lick.

 

The first time I ever heard anybody use the word “shred” associated with a guitar was from Joe after we had discovered the first riff I could play that sounded fast and “shreddy”. We used the term constantly after that. Perhaps it’s possible that he was the first to coin that phrase?

 

We discovered new music together, went to concerts and once we were old enough to get away with fake id (14 perhaps, the drinking age was 18 at the time) we started going to funky rock and roll dump bars on Long Island with our group of greaser friends. We would try not to miss going to shows by some of the Long Island elite bands when they played such as Twisted Sister, Zebra, Rat Race Choir, The Good Rats, etc.

Our group of rocker friends liked partying, getting into trouble, hooking up with girls, smoking weed, (mostly cut with oregano) starting fights, riding motorbikes and just finding mischief whenever they could. This was in great contrast to the social activities of the “cleaner” group of kids that lived on my street… BIG contrast.

 

Another turning point was when I joined the band “Rayge” at the age of perhaps 14 with some of the other rockers in our roving youth gang of a town. The band played, Zeppelin, Kiss, Bowie, Queen, Aerosmith and all that great rock music from the 70’s. We played all sorts of odd gigs like back yard parties, bars on Long Island, High school dances, parks, or anyplace that would have us. We had a built in rowdy audience in our large group of wild friends who all took part in virtually every show we ever played. Things usually seemed to really get heated up whenever we would play “Born to be Wild”. It was like a call to arms of destruction and teenage insanity whenever we played it. We would make it like 30 minutes long and it acted as a hysteria potion.

 

It was so great to be a teenager on Long Island in the 70’s and playing in a rock band. Joe was there with me through it all, virtually every show, every rehearsal and all our spare time. Besides fixing my guitars when they broke, he was the band’s electronic and light show mastermind. He was in charge of the light show and he and I would sneak around the neighborhood at night and “borrow” flood lights from people’s properties which he used to build a make-shift lighting truss. We would go to JC Pennies and purchase these little rocket engines for these toy rockets they sold. They actually had flash powder in them and we would sit for days and peel the outer wrapping and gather all the flash powder for these flash pots he rigged that we would use at the shows when I would do my Jimmy Page impersonation with a violin bow. I would strike the guitar with the bow and when the echo came out, Joe would hit the flash pot. One time while doing a gig in our high school gymnasium, the flash pots malfunctioned and they all went off at once and singed my eyelashes off. This was miraculous fun. 

 

After the gig the entire gymnasium was thick with smoke and as it dissipated it left in its wake a pile of beer bottles, articles of clothing soaked in vomit, all sorts of odd debris, and a handful of passed out high school students.

 

 

When I wrote my first orchestra score, “Sweet Wind from Orange County” when I was perhaps 15 or 16 years old, Joe was there to encourage me. He even did the art work for the cover of the score.

We loved to eat… a lot. At times I weighed close to 200 pounds in high school.

Joe and I would always save a few quarters after we bought beer on the weekends to purchase a few sticks of butter. We would stash the butter in the bushes before we went out for the night because in the middle of our town was a bakery that baked their fresh bread all night. When we would show up there after the nights festivities at around 3-4am, the bakery folks would give us a few loaves of freshly baked warm Italian bread. We would retrieve the butter stash and pig out! It was amazing.

 

One night we got home to my house at around 4am and were pretty out of it. We were also quite hungry. I made one of my “famous” tuna melts. You mix the tuna with a ton of mayo and onions and then spread it out on a piece of bread, cover it with Velveeta cheese and melt it in the toaster oven. Pure delight, but in the morning, I asked my Mom if there was anything for lunch. She said there was a can of tuna in the cabinet. I told her Joe and I ate that last night. She said, “well, I saw it there yesterday, it’s next to the can of cat food”. That’s when I looked in the cabinet and to my surprise, the only can of anything in there was of tuna fish. Those were the best cat food cheese melts we ever had. 

 

There were many times when I learned things from Joe that had a tremendous effect on my perspective. I remember once when his girlfriend got a car I said to him, “This is great, now you can ask her if we can borrow her car to go out to the Hamptons this weekend” and he said, “Nah, that’s her car. I’m not going to be that guy”. This seemed simple enough, but it had a huge impact on me.

 

I remember I purchased my first car from the singer in our group for $50. It was a Chevy Impala and had a totally blown engine and wouldn’t even start. Joe and I would just sit in it for hours at a time talking and imagining we had a real car.

Eventually I received a hand-me-down Buick LeSabre from my parents that was on its last wheels. That car became our sanctuary. We went everywhere in it. It had no heating or AC but that didn’t matter.

I believe the first place we drove to in that car was to get our first tattoos together. We started drawing these tattoos years before we got them. We would sit at the table in my kitchen and just draw. He was so much better at it than me. But we had finally decided what we wanted, and we went and got our first tattoos together.

 

We were really into Harleys. All the older cool guys had one. My brother Roger had an amazing chopper. Joe and I would just fantasize about owning one. Then as fate would have it, Joe was hit by a car while crossing Glen Cove Road on his bicycle. He was OK… sort of, but there was an insurance settlement that he was eligible for on his 17th birthday. When that day came Joe received the money and immediately purchased my brothers 1200cc Harley chopper.

 

It was like we hit the jackpot. We rode EVERYWHERE around Long Island on that bike. How we survived based on the things we did is still a phenomenon to me. Joe would stand on the seat with his arms out in an iron cross and ride through town. He was the only guy we knew that would ride his Harley barefoot. One time he came riding through town with his legs stretched out over the handlebars like he was relaxing and watching tv. In his mouth hung a cigarette, in one hand a beer, and in the other a handful of bottle rockets. He would drink the beer and light the bottle rocket with his cigarette and then discharge them at his unsuspecting victims while whizzing by them on his Harley.

 

Although a big part of me was very rock and roll and “greaseresque”, in my heart of hearts I wanted to be a composer and a guitar player, and I wanted to further my studies by attending Berklee college of Music. This did not sit well with the band as we all had fantasies of going on to becoming a famous rock band. I just never felt that was a realistic thing because the whole idea of being that successful seemed so impossible to me. But I believe the band knew that I had different aspirations, so I was off with their blessing… I think.

I was going to miss that little town, the band and our wild group friends, but I knew I was really going to miss Joe. But I also knew it was time for me to transition.

Around the time I left for Berklee Joe started to get serious with his guitar building talents and started building guitars instead of just fixing them. We always stayed in contact and saw each other whenever we could.

 

When I joined David Lee Roth’s band, Joe made me a bunch of guitars, the lightning bolt guitar, swiss cheese guitar, the flame guitar, and a handful of others. His approach to making guitars was similar to his approach to other things which was insightful, bombastic, seemingly haphazard but with a creative panache that captured his personality and intentions. The guitars he made for me were best suited as stage guitars. They were bold and exotic looking in a way only he could muster.

He hand-made me the one and only original “Flame” guitar that I used quite a bit with Roth and Whitesnake. I used the guitars he made me periodically through those years. Several were stolen from a storage locker in Pasadena while I was rehearsing with Roth.

Joe called his guitars “Jems” and one of the reasons I named my signature Ibanez guitar the “Jem” was in hopes to bring some attention to him and his work. The early guitars he made me bore no real resemblance to the Jem I designed for Ibanez, but Joe was the first one I asked to put a monkey grip in one of my guitars.

He made such odd and inventive instruments. I still have some. He even made me a beautiful instrument a few years ago. Making these wild instruments was Joe’s passion and he did it with much joy and brilliance. His specialty was animated type flames. He just had a way of understanding certain things such as electronics, handy crafts, etc. He was just great at it all.

Joe was always surprising us with his inventive work but perhaps the most outstanding thing about Joe Despagni was the size of his heart. He was just a really good, fun and easy guy. He had a particular integrity that helped to fill in so many of my blanks. He was tremendously supportive of me through my entire life.

 

As I sit and write this I’m completely in awe at all the absolutely amazing life experiences we had, the things we did, the places we went, the secrets we shared. Only a very small amount of these adventures is written about here. We knew each other better than anyone. And though my heart is heavy I can’t be more grateful to the Universe for Joe and I having each other in this life. I’m blessed with many best friends in life, from different situations, towns, times, etc. but as mentioned, there’s something about that one person that you have through those teenage years that’s just a little different. Someone that was a blessing in your life.

If not for my relationship with Joe Despagni, Steve Vai the guitar player and the Ibanez Jem would most certainly not be as they are known today. Joe really was a game changer for me and I loved him so much, and still do. I love thinking about him and our crazy youthful days and when I do that, in a way, he’s even closer to me than when he was among us in the flesh.

Here’s to you my dear friend. Thank you for who you were and all we had.

 

Steve Vai

June 1, 2018

6:57 PM

Los Angeles

 



AGS Tour recap

Hey Folks, 

Pia and I just returned from a fabulous “Alien Guitar Secrets” master class tour in Europe. 

I got to visit some places I have never been and met some wonderful folks along the way. 

I so much enjoy doing these little tours and would like to thank all the fine people that attended the classes. 

A special shout out to my good buddy Riccardo Cappelli who organized the trip and had us laughing virtually the whole time. 

We were in :

Oslo Norway, Helsinki Finland, Zoetermeer Netherlands, Guilford UK, Madrid Spain, Luxembourg, Malta, Athens Greece,  Isola Del Liri Italy and Tel Aviv Israel

 

 

One other bit of cool news. Some time ago, The Hard Rock Cafe acquired my 1946 Harley Davidson Knuckle Head motorcycle and it’s on display in their Daytona location. I loved that motorcycle and put a lot of miles on it back in the 90’s and now it’s so nice to see it in a place where more people could enjoy it than when it was sitting in my garage!

 

 

 



NTR Radio & podcast interview with Steve

This Sunday, March 18th ,  Mr. Vai & Co de Kloet will discuss the creation of Pink & Blows Over in Co Live! 

Co will also air the Complete Version so it turns into yet another SV Special at NTR!

It will air at  20.00 hrs Local Dutch Time (12:00 PDT,  15:00 EDT) on NTR Radio and is released right after the broadcast as a podcast. 

Download this, and all the other Co Live! podcasts right here.

And….

Send Co an email about this: the first 15 emails receive a free limited edition Co Live! CD

colive@ntr.nl



Alien Guitar Secrets Masterclasses 2018

A short series of masterclasses have been scheduled for Europe in March 2018:

 

March 10th – Larvik (Norway) – Larvik Gitar Festival (sold out) – http://www.larvikgitarfestival.com/

March 12th – Espoo (Finland) – Sellosali – 7.00 pm – tickets

March 13th – Zoetermeer (Netherlands) – De Boerderij – 8.00 pm  – tickets  Yasi Hofer will open for this class.

March 14th – Guildford (UK) – The Mandolay Hotel – 8.00 pm – tickets

March 17th – Esch sur Alzette (Luxembourg) – Rockhal – 8.00 pm – tickets

March 20th – Athens (Greece) – Athena Live – 7.00 pm – tickets

March 21st – Isola del Liri (FR) (Italy) – Cinema Teatro Mangoni – 8.30 pm – tickets

 Seats are linited, so book yours quickly. See you there!

 



India 2017

Hey Folks, 

The show in Pune India on Dec 9, 2017 was magical as was the show on October 28th in Meghalaya. I usually wouldn’t travel to as far away a place as India for a one-off show, but I’ve always wanted to perform in India and myself and the band are ecstatic over the whole trip in general. Traveling through India is a unique experience itself, and it was such a nice surprise to see the legions of music loving fans who attended this festival. 

Deep appreciation to all who worked so hard to put this show on, to all the bands that contributed to this amazing festival, to my band, crew and management… who in one week slept less than perhaps any other tour we ever embarked on, to the incomparable Mohini Dey who joined us on stage for a jam at both shows and totally tore it up, and especially to the fans for their incredibly warm support. 

For us it was a perfect convergence. In my minds eye I can go back to that last show and look out over the connected audience, the beautiful evening air, the excellent sound that the stage offered, the feeling of the music flowing through us as a band and into the audience. When I do this, I find myself swooning in the delicious realm of pure appreciation. 

s.

Photos by Vicram Chandrasekar

[ngg_images source=”galleries” container_ids=”127″ display_type=”photocrati-nextgen_basic_thumbnails” override_thumbnail_settings=”0″ thumbnail_width=”90″ thumbnail_height=”108″ thumbnail_crop=”1″ images_per_page=”30″ number_of_columns=”6″ ajax_pagination=”1″ show_all_in_lightbox=”0″ use_imagebrowser_effect=”0″ show_slideshow_link=”1″ slideshow_link_text=”[Show as slideshow]” template=”default” order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”ASC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″]