Eric Johnson & The Korg MR2000S

The name says it all! Discuss Steve's studios, your studios and gear set-ups, amps and effects here. This is not for discussing guitars (Steve's or otherwise).
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Stephen Brown
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lydian2000
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Then if I understood this correctly the old "analog vs digital" debate is clearly over now?

http://www.acousticfingerstyle.com/Futu ... lained.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:)


:peace
Stephen Brown
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Thanks for the cool info you put up there Lydian..

A good read.
Patill
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lydian2000 wrote:Then if I understood this correctly the old "analog vs digital" debate is clearly over now?
it has been over for years in recording.

The debate in other arms of electrics will still remain ;).
Pi2plank
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yeah, the article was quite a good read.. but this had me wondering..
As we mentioned, the human hearing range tops out at about 20 kHz, and the Nyquist theorem shows that we need to sample at slightly faster than double that. This is how CDs ended up using 44.1 kHz as their sampling frequency. It is the lowest rate that assures accurate sampling through the entire hearing range.
i thought that the 44.1KHz thing was kinda like the common ground (number) for both PAL & NTSC. i've read an article somewhere explaining the number 44.1KHz & like why it wasn't rounded down to 44KHz or something..
Stephen Brown
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Pi2plank wrote:yeah, the article was quite a good read.. but this had me wondering..
As we mentioned, the human hearing range tops out at about 20 kHz, and the Nyquist theorem shows that we need to sample at slightly faster than double that. This is how CDs ended up using 44.1 kHz as their sampling frequency. It is the lowest rate that assures accurate sampling through the entire hearing range.
i thought that the 44.1KHz thing was kinda like the common ground (number) for both PAL & NTSC. i've read an article somewhere explaining the number 44.1KHz & like why it wasn't rounded down to 44KHz or something..
After spending some time reading, multi subjects are crossed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Book_% ... tandard%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_frequency
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_rate
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_t ... _frequency The math behind.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_audio AD-DA.

Found it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_disc
"A standard NTSC video signal has 245 usable lines per field, and 59.94 fields/s, which works out at 44,056 samples/s/stereo channel. Similarly, PAL has 294 lines and 50 fields, which gives 44,100 samples/s/stereo channel. This system could either store 14-bit samples with some error correction, or 16-bit samples with almost no error correction.

There was a long debate over whether to use 14-bit (Philips) or 16-bit (Sony) quantization, and 44,056 or 44,100 samples/s (Sony) or around 44,000 samples/s (Philips). When the Sony/Philips task force designed the Compact Disc, Philips had already developed a 14-bit D/A converter, but Sony insisted on 16-bit. In the end, 16 bits and 44.1 kilosamples per second prevailed. Philips found a way to produce 16-bit quality using their 14-bit DAC by using four times oversampling."
Kremlin
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FRETPICK wrote:
Pi2plank wrote:yeah, the article was quite a good read.. but this had me wondering..
As we mentioned, the human hearing range tops out at about 20 kHz, and the Nyquist theorem shows that we need to sample at slightly faster than double that. This is how CDs ended up using 44.1 kHz as their sampling frequency. It is the lowest rate that assures accurate sampling through the entire hearing range.
i thought that the 44.1KHz thing was kinda like the common ground (number) for both PAL & NTSC. i've read an article somewhere explaining the number 44.1KHz & like why it wasn't rounded down to 44KHz or something..
After spending some time reading, multi subjects are crossed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Book_% ... tandard%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_frequency
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_rate
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_t ... _frequency The math behind.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_audio AD-DA.

Found it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_disc
"A standard NTSC video signal has 245 usable lines per field, and 59.94 fields/s, which works out at 44,056 samples/s/stereo channel. Similarly, PAL has 294 lines and 50 fields, which gives 44,100 samples/s/stereo channel. This system could either store 14-bit samples with some error correction, or 16-bit samples with almost no error correction.

There was a long debate over whether to use 14-bit (Philips) or 16-bit (Sony) quantization, and 44,056 or 44,100 samples/s (Sony) or around 44,000 samples/s (Philips). When the Sony/Philips task force designed the Compact Disc, Philips had already developed a 14-bit D/A converter, but Sony insisted on 16-bit. In the end, 16 bits and 44.1 kilosamples per second prevailed. Philips found a way to produce 16-bit quality using their 14-bit DAC by using four times oversampling."
Bingo. It's all about the Nyquist theorem. Ideal audio equipment can in theory reproduce perfect audio from a CD up to 22,050 Hz. The key word is "ideal" -- as higher fidelity audio sampling technologies make their way into our living rooms (DVD-A, SACD) it is becoming easier for us to reproduce great audio with consumer products that mere mortals can afford.

I have a rich uncle who owns a listening room /w a full Goldmund audio setup that costs more than his Ferrari. DVD-Audio and plain-old CDs are indistinguishable in it, and both basically sound "live". It's almost creepy when a song ends, because your instinct to start clapping kicks in.

Analog is generally dead in all forms of media now. Video, audio, photo, print...
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