How to get big, loud, guitars at home.

The name says it all! Discuss Steve's studios, your studios and gear set-ups, amps and effects here. This is not for discussing guitars (Steve's or otherwise).
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glynn
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How to get big, loud, guitars at home.

#1 Post by glynn » Sun Apr 13, 2003 10:17 am

I'm sure many people have tips and tricks, to get that big fat sound to tape. Here are a few of mine:

Tube amps sound great at volume, but not everyone truly appreciates a raging stack of speakers blasting away for hours. You can build a box, but when you turn up the amp, you get the sound of an amp in a box, and that isn't good.

So here is what you do:

You need to get the speakers off the floor. You can use something like the gramma, or build your own device: Make the top of a table, small enough so the feet of the cabinet hang off the sides - then rest the cab on balls of earthquake putty on the corners. Make the bottom a little bigger for stability. Make the table top, bottom, and posts all from pressboard, or MDF, because it conducts much less than wood.The most important part is that the table bottom doesn't touch the floor, but sits on the bolts about an inch above the floor.

Now that we have decoupled the cab from the ground, we need to stop the huge amount of volume from disturbing the nationhood.

We are going to construct a big, wooden frame, a cube if you will. 2x2x4's work well, and remember to get a couple of extras for side support. you will need about 16 or so total.

Get some heavy duty moving pads, about $10-15 each. More is better. Place a moving pad on the ground where you are going to setup the cab, then put the gramma or similar device on top of that, then put the cab on it. Put the giant frame around the cab, centered. Tack the sides of the bottom moving pad to the frame.

Then, your going to put your mic and mic stand inside the frame, and run mic and speaker cables to the cab and mic. cover the frame with heavy duty moving pads. A lot of moving pads. Do the sides front and back first. Some tacks, or small nails will secure them, but it isn't really needed if you have enough pads.

The top is last, so that we can move them, and adjust the mic later in the recording process. If you use a standard adjustable mic stand, it should be pretty easy to reach in and adjust.

The whole thing is fairly inexpensive, moving pads are the biggest expenditure (I got mine in bulk from H E R E, but you can pick them up at a local U-haul, or similar establishment.

Looking forward to hear your ideas!

Friends by JS, as recorded by me, with the above 'tent of death'.

Cryin by JS, same as above.
-g
Last edited by glynn on Wed Apr 23, 2003 11:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Atomictoyz
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#2 Post by Atomictoyz » Wed Apr 16, 2003 4:53 pm

Thats a pretty good idea, in fact its what I did a few years back. Works pretty good for keeping noise away from the mic as well. It works most of the time. Home studio's are great.

Peace,
Dennis

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#3 Post by Rexgtr » Wed Apr 16, 2003 5:50 pm

I just use a Boss GT-5 fed directly into my mixer and record several unison takes
Dist Rhythm L 10 o clock
Dist Rhythm R 2 o clock
L
R
L
R
L
R
Makes even a so-so tone big, trick is playing extremely tight. (Unless you want a lil' looseness.(sp?) :P

I just don't have the ability to crank my tube amp and mic it and not get leakage in my headphones while tracking (Too small an apartment) 8)

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#4 Post by bobsbus » Wed Apr 16, 2003 5:57 pm

Glyn, Thanks a ton. I am mailing myself your post. I must try this. Good stuff. Thanks.

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#5 Post by Dave Swift » Wed Apr 16, 2003 7:12 pm

Glyn,

Are the demo tracks found on your website examples of your recording techniques mentioned above or were they done some other way? Sounds great, by the way.

glynn
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#6 Post by glynn » Wed Apr 16, 2003 7:17 pm

No problem :)

It kinda looks like this when your done:

Image

I like to call it the tent of death.

H E R E is a 3 meg clip of it in action. Lead recto, SS recto/full power, vintage channel, treble and volume 12:00, mids and lows at 9:00, no verb or presence, gain all the way up. Low pass at 80hz, verb and echo added via waves.

clean stuff was a podXT, direct.

Ignore the sometimes crappy player (ME).

glynn
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#7 Post by glynn » Wed Apr 16, 2003 7:23 pm

Dave Swift wrote:Glyn,

Are the demo tracks found on your website examples of your recording techniques mentioned above or were they done some other way? Sounds great, by the way.
Thanks!

Most of those demo's were the podxt, I just posted an mp3 with a clip done tonite with the TOD, "darkside-soslow.mp3" was with a blue baby bottle, done before I built the TOD. The piezo accustic stuff was a godin, direct, done a while ago, and the papoose was the baby blue again.

I should put up a page, and descriptions. Forgot I had a link to it, LOL!

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#8 Post by Carlo de Dios » Thu Apr 17, 2003 11:31 pm

glynn- nice tone...and your phrasing is most excellent. And I liked your DS-1 demo too (forgot to comment on that at the Jemsite or the JP forum) hehe

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#9 Post by glynn » Fri Apr 18, 2003 9:49 am

Cool! thanx for checkin them out!

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#10 Post by Junebughunter » Sun Apr 20, 2003 11:19 pm

I usually put my amp in the closet of my studio...and put a condenser mic directly in front of the amp speaker (a little to the side of the dome) seems to me to get the best, easy to mix sound for my setup

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add to the mix

#11 Post by toolofevolution » Mon Apr 21, 2003 10:41 pm

Hello fellas, I just wanted to add to the convo......... I have worked and designed a few major studios in the washington dc area including opera dog and XM satellite radio...........feel free to drop me a line

recording guitars................

well, for starters i would use a straight 4x12 cab no slants......

get an amp stand to elevate from the flooring..........

keep in mind the sound originates from the circumference of the speaker........sweep the speaker to find the freqs you are looking for without phasing .........

rec. mics: 414 , ksm 44, 421mkII, beta57, u87

i think Vai uses a 421 and a beta57, if you check the G3 DVD.......you will see a beta57.....and 421 is common practice

for sound proofing and sound absorbtion...........

www.markertek.com

great foam, very cheap

www.acousticalsolutions.com - based outta richmond

for all your sound proofing needs

read the myth sections, blankets and foam and lots of particle board wont stop a damn thing

to sound proof you need air tightness, space, and high density material.........

the air tightness will stop reverberation from the outside frame, while the high density matting + sheet rock will block bass freqs ( if you can stop bass freqs you can stop any freq, research what is called an STC rating).

air space is straight from high school physics

means to which sound travels easiest ........ from greatest to least

liquid
solid
gas


high density is usually a high density vinyl mat stapled on the frame then a metal resiliant off the frame and about 2 - 3 layers of sheet rock.

Density / Space / Density / Space will give a nice STC rating

Bass freqs are intense and the only way to counter them fully is with super high density materials. The matting is expensive but well worth it.

Also there is a specific ratio in which a box or room should be to best counter standing waves, i think its 11 x 4 x 9 if i am not mistaken......

Dont listen to these homegrown myths........foam attached onto another object only transfers sound

foam is used to kill reverberation in a room or box, not sound proof it

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#12 Post by Junebughunter » Mon Apr 21, 2003 11:29 pm

I swear my best "BIG" guitar tone was recorded with just a mic in front of my amp...sounded great :)

Thanks for all the info that is quite interesting

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regards

#13 Post by toolofevolution » Mon Apr 21, 2003 11:31 pm

this is all in regards to critical isolation.............and i totally believe you, i have too!

=)

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#14 Post by TheTwanMan » Wed Apr 23, 2003 11:20 am

well, i made this interresting contraption, invented by scott henderson, and it works great:D http://www.scotthenderson.net/gear.htm

Scroll down to the recording bit;)

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Great Stuff

#15 Post by Blair » Wed Apr 23, 2003 7:06 pm

I'd just like to say that these boards are great! I didn't even have to ask a question regarding amp mic'ing...... All the information is allready here!

:wink: How cool!

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