8/8 Timing.....

Discuss playing styles and techniques, or share your own here.
brainpolice
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"So I believe you have to be given the beat subdivision to play it correct.
It can be 3+3+2, 2+3+3 or 3+2+3"
I get what you're saying, but why not feel that as 8th notes accented like that in 4/4? ONE and two AND three and FOUR and is a quite COMMON feel, but I've always seen it just in 4/4. I still don't see a full justification for 8/8.
FINGERS76
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The top eight means there are 8 beats in the measure.

The bottom eight means that an 8th note gets one beat.

Why is this so complicated?

I think some people like to type too much. :D

You could write in 1/1 2/2 4/4 8/8 16/16, it would sound the same. There are no compound beats.
Last edited by FINGERS76 on Mon Jan 31, 2005 3:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
brainpolice
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I know how time signatures work, please dont insult my intelligence, i've been a drummer for 10 years. I've been sight reading charts for most of that time, and never saw a single "8/8" time signature. You didn't explain anything.
Last edited by brainpolice on Mon Jan 31, 2005 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
FINGERS76
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brainpolice wrote:I know how time signatures work, please dont insult my intelligence, i've been a drummer for 10 years. You didn't explain anything.
There is nothing to explain. You being a drummer explains it all now. 4/4 and 8/8 sound the same it is just the notation that is different. maybe the guy wants to use longer measures. who knows?
brainpolice
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"4/4 and 8/8 sound the same it is just the notation that is different."
Either you're spot on about that, or 8/8 doesn't exist. One of the two. So in a way I agree with you, but 8/8 isn't something that exists to me, so I truly go with the 2nd choice.
FINGERS76
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brainpolice wrote:"4/4 and 8/8 sound the same it is just the notation that is different."
Either you're spot on about that, or 8/8 doesn't exist. One of the two. So in a way I agree with you, but 8/8 isn't something that exists to me, so I truly go with the 2nd choice.
That is the point, 8/8 exists so does 1/1. I can't think of a practical reason to use either. That doesn't mean someone can't, shouldn't or doesn't use them.
brainpolice
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I can't think of practical reason either.
FINGERS76
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Now all we need is for you to admit someone else might have a practical reason for it, and the planets will align.
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b2
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Brainpolice wrote:
"I get what you're saying, but why not feel that as 8th notes accented like
that in 4/4? ONE and two AND three and FOUR and"

Yes I belive you have right. But it is maybe just a choice of notation?
When some see 8/8 they know it is irregular meter and that they will
have some beats subdivided in 3 and others in 2.
If you see 4/4 you will believe you have 4 beats pr bars. And every beat is subdividen in 2.
And 8/8 have just 3 beats pr bar.... I believe hehe :wink:
But of course just the meter is not enough. You have also to know
the beat subdivision.

You could say: This is 8/8 and beat subdivision is 3+3+2
Or you could say this is 4/4 BUT play 8th notes with accent like this
Strong-weak-weak-Strong-weak-weak-Strong-weak

It is maybe easier with the first one? And more "correct" for notation?
4/4 would mean 4 beats in every bar and each beat should have the
same duration, a quarter note.
8/8 have only 3 beats and with different duration.

I am not shure... STEVE VAI!!! PLEASE HELP US HERE!!! hehe :D

You know when a conductor is conducting a music piece in 4/4 he or
she will have this cross pattern hand movement. This to show the
4 beats. The musicans will follow this movement to get the beat.

If it at the start of the paper was written 4/4 every would believe
the conducter would use this cross pattern hand movement, 4 beats.
But what if he did a 3 position pattern movement and with not equal beat
duration? I belive all the musicans would think he was conducting a
wrong piece :wink:

So when they see 8/8 they know, this is 3 beats and hopefully the conductor
will tell us or it is written on the paper the beat subdivision.
And then the conductor can start conducting with use of a 3 position pattern to show the beats.
(I am not shure how conducters will conduct a piece with complex meter.
Maybe they use a pattern with more positions?)

Also on the paper/score with meter 4/4 the notes would be grouped
in 4 groups. But in 8/8 meter with 3 beats the notes would be grouped
in 3 groups. This to easier see where the beat is.
So using 4/4 meter to notate a 3 beat pr bar piece would be something
not normally done I believe.

BUT again I am not shure.. I am learning as I write and read now :D
I have not very much experience with this stuff so it would be nice if
a well educated could give the answer here.
FINGERS76
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I think you could do the same thing in 4/4.

if you had a rhythm in quarter notes such as one and two and three and four, and you played triplets over them you would have a triplet feel, yet you would still be in 4/4.
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b2
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Yes but with 4/4 meter it is sayed implicit that you will have 4 beats pr bar and
each beat have equal duration.
So you have to, or should use another meter if you had something
like Strong-weak-weak-Strong-weak-weak-Strong-weak. (3+3+2).
Wich is 3 beats pr bar and with different beat duration.
FINGERS76
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What if my drummer was playing in 4/4 and i decided to play a lick with 5 notes in the space of two. that would be 5:2 on the paper but still in 4/4 time.
spcastlemagic
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The only reason I can think of for using 8/8 is if you have some sort of time shifting riff that does something like (5/8-7/8-9/8-8/8-7/8), and you make that fourth measure 8/8 just for continuity's sake.
brainpolice
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At least we should all realize this by now: 8/8 doesn't really seem practical (altough apparently it exists). You COULD just write it properly in 4/4, You don't have to accent a straight pulse to be in 4/4. You could do anything you want, you could feel groups of 3, 5, 7, and 9's and use cool rythmic displacements, but it will still be in 4/4. What you play/write doesn't have to directly rythmically lock in with the pulse at all.
Ryan Layton
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but if you could use the same argument and say that 4/4 isn't nessicary and that we should all use 2/2

or say that we should get rid of 6/8 and 3/8 because they can all be notated in 3/4
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