Transcribing! Ear Training? help!

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vejiita
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Transcribing! Ear Training? help!

#1 Post by vejiita » Sat Jan 29, 2005 5:42 pm

hi everybody

lately i am concentrating more on improving my ear.
I realized all the vai tab books and practicing scales/modes/technique
wont be as beneficial as developing your ear.

Lately i decided to do some transcribing and picking stuff off records.
Is it really hard to pick out Petrucci/Vai/satriani stuff by ear?
any tips/advice is appreciated on ear training.
thanx

brainpolice
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#2 Post by brainpolice » Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:28 pm

Anything you put yourself up to you can do (cheesy ey?). I've transcribed various times. With a decent ear and a decent sense of music theory, anyone can transcribe Vai, Dreamtheater, Zappa, Coltrane, anything they want. With a decent concept of notation, it should be a piece of cake. Although, you might run into some things that you dont understand how to notate in some adventurous music by the likes of Debussy, Edgar Varese, Frank Zappa, Steve Vai, Mr. Bungle, Etc. ; Find out how. There are very many modern sonorities that have been created. There may be rythmic things that you don't know how to notate, but if you learn about things such as poly-rythm, odd time signatures, metric modulation, quintuplets, septuplets, nuetuplets, etc., You'll know what to do. It's not as hard as it seems. In the end all one has to do is have the will to learn in the first place, and the answers are right there.

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phoenix2874
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#3 Post by phoenix2874 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 7:10 pm

Wow BP...that was the most oversimplified breakdown of transcribing I think i`ve ever seen :wink: . Albeit 100% accurate, you didn`t mention the time required to get to the point where all that info adds up to being able to transcribe. But he is correct, put in the time to learn how music is written and develop a decent ear and transcribing becomes considerably easier.

kpxmikey89
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#4 Post by kpxmikey89 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 7:36 pm

satriani shouldnt be as hard as vai or yngwie. ygnwie music is !@#$%ing fast... it just gives me a brain damge, and vai music is !@#$%^ing complex and fingertwisting that it gives me a brain damage :o

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#5 Post by shyboy12 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 8:34 pm

Hey man, I'm exactly in the same position as you. I recently made a post here on ear training and recieved plenty of helpful feedback. Firstly, I recommend you learn to recognise intervals by ear. Download an ear training program called Earope, you can just find it on google. Practice everyday and also work on some sight reading. I've only recently started working some music theory and ear training into my practice schedule and the improvement is very noticeable. Hope this helps...

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#6 Post by Franks » Sun Jan 30, 2005 6:18 am

Of course a program that helps you slow down the music always helps, look for Amazing Slow Downer or (even better) Transcribe!. I think both sites offer free trial versions.

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#7 Post by atifman » Sun Jan 30, 2005 12:50 pm

kpxmikey89 wrote:satriani shouldnt be as hard as vai or yngwie.
i think he is, there's a bunch of funky rhythms and irregular groupings in his solos

my advice to the guy above is, start off by transcribing songs that don't have solos in them (if you listen to those kinds of songs, ;) ), then do songs with simple solos, then move up to more complex solos.

and when you transcribe, don't just go note-by-note and try to find each note on the guitar. Listen to the melody lines in groups of 3s and 4s, which you'll find in other songs. That way you'll eventually be able to recognize what scale a solo or lick is in just by listening to it ("that's a pentatonic lick or lydian lick, etc.")

you might find this beneficial too:
http://metaltabs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12855

vejiita
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#8 Post by vejiita » Mon Jan 31, 2005 7:25 am

hey this is cool.

anyway its good to improve your ear.. Actually to tell you the truth
i havent bought a single tab book in the last year .. haha.
its fun figuring out music on your own. Dont be lazy get that cd player
spining your guitar and clean out all the wax in your ear and get to it!

well for kicks yesterday i listened to the carvin legacy demo by vai
again and try to figured it out.. some of the clean stuff is hard.

also one thing that helps alot is singing. Try singing and playing the exact
melody on your guitar. THis will greatly improve your ear and
translating the music you hear in your head into your guitar.

I still need help so would appreciate any more
feedback on this

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#9 Post by jmchambers5 » Mon Feb 07, 2005 4:07 pm

kpxmikey89 wrote:satriani shouldnt be as hard as vai or yngwie. ygnwie music is !@#$%ing fast... it just gives me a brain damge, and vai music is !@#$%^ing complex and fingertwisting that it gives me a brain damage :o
But Yngwie plays almost completely in key, all the time. All you really have to be able to do is spot patterns, so you can say "he's just running up harmonic minor" "now he's going down in thirds" "that's a diminished lick repeated at minor thirds" and pretty much have a yngwie solo done.

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#10 Post by brainpolice » Mon Feb 07, 2005 7:43 pm

LOL. True!
Hey look at me!!!!!!! DA DA DA DA!!!!!!! *fully diminished arpeggio rundown* DA DA DA DA!!!!!!! *fully diminished arpeggio rundown*
(stradle your guitar and smirk) *harmonic minor this harmonic minor that*
*fully diminished arpeggio* (throw your guitar around your neck and then get on your knees) (make a face) *fully diminished arpegio*
*Completely stepwise straight 32nd notes with no phrasing for a while*
I V I V I V I V I V I V I
:)

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#11 Post by markelia » Tue Feb 08, 2005 7:24 am

Yngwie has become a bit of a caricature of himself, but man, just listen to that first record (Rising Force). His tone and musicality really shine there. He's got that godly tone and vibrato, and his songs are just bursting with bachrock attitude. (Too bad the snare sound on that record stinks. :oops: )

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