Help ! I suck on guitar !

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KeithH
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Help ! I suck on guitar !

#1 Post by KeithH » Sun Nov 14, 2004 5:29 am

Help !

I play elelctric guitar in my home as a hobby, for half an hour here and there every other day.

I have an RG2550EX, a washburn amp and an old multi effects unit. Ive got an old strat copy I could take into the lounge and practise on to get more hours in.

I have been playing for a few years on and off, but all I ever seem to play is Enter Sandman, and a couple of old Gary Moore and easy Van Halen songs. (rythym parts, not the solos!)

I went to see a band live last week and their guitar player was a lot younger than me(Im 34), but had Sultans of swing, Van Halen Jump, I want to break free, solos included, down great ! I wish I could really really play, I was really jealous.

Any suggestions of techniques/practices methods that can break me out of this rut and get me playing well ?

Any suggestions/tips/schedules GREATLY appreciated.


Dont suggest I start with "for the love of god" though !! ha ha

PS I know NO THEORY OR MUSIC knowledge at all, I just pick stuff up by ear by moving round the neck until it sounds right.

Come on super shredders, you were rubbish once, how did you get good ?

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#2 Post by Svante » Sun Nov 14, 2004 5:48 am

Hi there!

sorry for my little broke english.

Well, i have played guitar now for about 5-6 years,, i started with Metallica, and like you i got stuck,, i just played it and played it, i tried to force myself into a lot of stuff, like Stevie Ray, Gary Morre and so on. I was playing rythm for the msot part, but sure some solo sometimes. Well, after a few years my buddy got a copy of G3 with Eric, Satch and Vai. I thought well to be good you got to know these guys, so a bought one myself. And i was so blow away that my body was chaking like nuts. I never was so inspierd to do somting, and whats blow the the most, IS VAI, So after that i got evry Vai cd and tab i possibly could find. So to this day iam still playing a lot of Vai, but i trie to find my own way. So, that little dvd changed my whole scen of music. Ive learnd theory, emotions, it really helped me on alot of stages. So my advice, listen to music, alot of diffrent kind of, some time you will find something that really hits you like a 3 ton stone in youre head. Dont be feard to try to play things.

Sur you can always practise scales and things like that. But to bee a really good guitar player you got to love waht you play so much thats you blow youre self off. I not saying iam the best, beacuse iam not, but i have found somting that i love to death and thats make me good. When you find somthing like that, evry thing falls into its place.

wow. this was a long story, hope it can help you somewaht :)

/svante

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#3 Post by KeithH » Sun Nov 14, 2004 6:14 am

I listen to, and play, mainly Gary Moore, Aeromsith, Offspring, Metallica, and of course Steve Vai.

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#4 Post by The Extremist » Sun Nov 14, 2004 6:42 am

Just learn some simple theory, man, im not big into the whole theory thing really, most people drown me with their knowledge of theory, but i know enough to get me by and write a song or two and play a good number of songs.

Just try and learn tabs for songs you like and just stick at it. Sometimes just go crazy.

Sure learn the pentatonic scale, its bloody simple, but it will allow you to do some solo's.

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#5 Post by KeithH » Sun Nov 14, 2004 7:28 am

Ive just realised I wrote above that I "listen to and play Steve Vai"

Im not even good enough to play the first note of any Steve Vai song.

Would it help if I joined a band ? it would have to be a beginners band, I dont want to turn up and everyone else say "OK, today were going to do "for the love of god"!

Where do you find bands, or jamming partners ? Where could I advertise, or look around ?

I was talking to a man in a bar a few weeks ago and he was very arrogant regarding how good he said his son was, his first words were "he is better than you, he can play eugenes trick bag" I dont want to be amongst arrogant people that will just put me off.

Should I learn some chords and theory ?

Should I learn improvisation ?

I dont know where the hell to start, please help me !

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#6 Post by The Extremist » Sun Nov 14, 2004 8:18 am

First step is to pick up your guitar.

Next Step - Find a song you like

3rd Step - Find Tab for song

4th Step - Play Song on CD Player or Computer

5th Step - Try play along

6th Step - Keep at it

Just for today, just try and learn a song.

Then tomorrow, go and learn The Pentatonic scale, then use it to play a quick solo over the song when you listen to it.

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#7 Post by TonyO » Sun Nov 14, 2004 9:16 am

KeithH,

Hi! I'm TonyO...Like you, I am 34, except I've been playing guitar for about 20 years now. I have many influences. I started out playing everything by Iron Maiden and Metallica, since at the time, they were the Metal Gods! I'll appologize for the length of this thing, but I've always been of the notion that without some good history and a little story telling...

At the time, my Buddy from middle/high school, Ken, had been playing for about ten years at the time. He could play practically anything....Boston, Zeppelin, Halen, Hendrix, Priest etc...Unfortunately, he no longer plays. He was on of the biggest influences on my playing and had probably the most original metal style I've ever heard to this day. He was way ahead of his time.

The dude was brilliant! He learned everything by ear. He would learn the parts, as I watched in awe, the constant, stop, rewind, play, stop rewind etc... He learned the parts he wanted to me to play, showed them to me, and then learned his parts... Of course, after showing me my parts there was always the constant, "Dude! Quit playing! I'm trying to learn my part and can't hear anything with you playing!" So, eventually, I would chill, he would llearn his parts and then we would jam.

Within the first year of my playing, I was able to play everything by Iron Maiden and the 1st 3 Metallica albums...We moved on to Yngwie and RacerX, Mr Big, Dokken, Boston...anything thing except the sell-outs at the time. Unfortunately, we all get older etc., and everyone's paths in life start taking on a character of their own. Neeedless to stay, I pretty much stayed true to my roots as a musician. By the time I was 19 (5 years after I started playing), I discovered DiMeola, Holdsworth etc., and he (Ken) unfortunately moved onto the grunge movement and by the time he was 25 (I was 26) he sold out to the likes of Pearl Jam etc. whlie I was honing my Tony MacAlpine and Paul Gilbert (Mr Big).

For the most part, I've never been in the mainstream. I love anything Tony MacAlpine, especially Cab...and anything Billy Sheehan, especially Niacin.

Needless to say, Pearl Jam is a great band in their own right and they have some good tunes, but Ken no longer plays and I still do...which is really unfortunate, since he was truley a reckoning force as far as guitar goes...

When I was 23 I was fortunate to be influenced by some of the greatest Jazzers of the modern era. Of course, being from a strict metal back ground, and being able to play anything at the speed of light, and totally playing outside the realm of "feel" or "the blues", I may have been technically proficient, but I had no idea about "playing" music.

The jazzers would say..."You have no idea, do you?" Of course, completely spellbound and insulted, I was like..."What the @#$% are you talking about? Do you realize how good I am?" And they were right!

I had no idea. I started college when I was 23, and started honing my self-learnd musical thoery by taking theory in college and joining the Jazz ensemble. By this time, I had gotten some "Return of the Brecker Brothers" under my belt, and started getting into Coltrane and Miles...I found Mike Stern, and then I found SRV...finally! Can you imagine? I had loved SRV when I was younger, but it wasn't metal, so I never incorporated it into my playing. I started getting into Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, etc. I actually started going back in time--a complete reversal.

12 years after I had started playing guitar I found that I was discovering the roots of guitar! And it's all in the blues...so if you don't ahave any...get some! Don't get me wrong...Iron Maiden and Metallica (the real Metallica) will always remain in my heart and be my true influences, thus, keeping me metal...which I prefer over everything, except for Cab and Niacin, but the thing is as I grow musically, I've realized that if I hadn't discovered the heart and soul of the instrument, I'd be lost.

Many of Vai's leads are so blues laiden...TMAC's too! The best advice I can give to everyone out there is simply start listening to music other than the mainstream... Listen to music that isn't on the radio... Especially classical music and "real" jazz. It will be hard at first to understand and relate to much of the music, but eventually, it just comes natural. If I had in on tape and eventually cd, I was playing to it...whether right or wrong...I was having fun! I used to pop in music and just play along to it. It was probably out of key...all of it! But I was the only one in the room so it really didn't matter. I played for 15 hours a day. I got expelled for 2 semesters in high school due to ditching so I could play my guitar...although my parents were pisst about that one, it defintely worked in my benefit (although for any of you in school, I do not condone ditching to play guitar...what worked for me, may not necessarily work the same for you!).

As my playing began to mature and as I listened to a more diverse collection of music, I would simlpy play along to it...even if its out of key. You can worry about playing note for note when you get into a really "great" bar band. I'm sure many of you out there know the deal... "Dude...we want the songs to sound jsut like they are on the radio! So if you can't or won't..." and of course my response is, "Oh! You mean like evey 'bar' band in America?"

I've played note for note...I've played so far out on the edge it would make Coltrane's "Live at Birdland" sound good...if that's possible . The bottom line is if you are begining, there are a couple rules you will want to adhere to strictly...

The first is know your instrument! In order to have a good idea of what to play, you needs to know what you're playing...namely the notes: what notes a major scale consists of; what notes a minor scale consists of; and how they relate to one another. And just simply "know" all the notes on the neck! You don't need to be able to read music...just relate to it. If you know the notes...how they are arranged, what sifgnifies a key signature and why, you are ahead of most everyone who even owns a guitar.

The second, even more important...just play what feels good! And start learning songs in general! Unfortunately, at 34, I still have grandiose dilusions of being a professional musician someday..to the point that I'm thinking of moving to L.A. Talk about, "Just grow up!" or "Sometimes you have to let a sleeping dog lie..." But I won't give up...talk about ignorance! I have a modest recording studio, professional equipment etc. So, since you aren't of the illusion that you are going to be a professional musician and influence the world of music on some grand scale, just play!

I've found what I was doing in my room 18 and 20 years ago is what is called improvising! You don't have to be a jazz musician or well learned musician to simply "improvise" to a piece of music. Just pick up the guitar and pop in a piece of music and begin to play along and over it! Who cares if its "right" or "wrong". So unless you're in one of those "really killer bar bands" who have the inside scoop and know "The end all be all" of playing eveything note for note, then there is no such thing as right or wrong! Just make sure you have "the time of your life" when you do it.

So given that you adhere to the above rules fairly strictly -- over time -- you will notice, in no time flat that what you are playing and what you are playing to gets a lot easier and gradually begins to sound a lot better than it did yesterday. Without knowing some songs...such as what might be considered the classics...you'll never be able to play with anyone. Unless, you're going for an all original thing.

And if you ever get caught in the illusion that what you're playing could possibly be wrong, then go out and pick up John Coltrane's "Live and Birdland". It is a true masterpiece of the most wonderfully awful improvisation to probably ever have taken place on the this planet! And he is reveared as the most innovative Sax player in the world...but without that little (recorded) jam session, whose to say he would have moved on to bigger, better things.

So now...back to an earlier sentiment! I sometimes find that it is really too bad we don't have the same 'amount" of time in a day that we did 15 and 20 years ago and a really good friend to jam with especially one who is far more knowledgable than you are so you can turn to them to ask questions. With taht being said...it's hard to find someone with that amount of time to invest in anyone as we get older. What can I say...the world is in a perfect place!

I've taught guitar technique and music theory now for about 14-15 years. I can say confidently that I have a thorough knowledge of music theory, my instruments of choice, and my music gear. That being said...if you can afford to take guitar lessons, take them! The shitty thing about taking lessons is that you may have the occasion to people who only want your money and don't really care if you learn anything or not. I've always been of the notion that if they're my students, and seeing as how I've had a fairly open and free schedule, they can call me anytime with questions etc., because although I charge for what has taken me "many years" to acquire -- hence I charge -- I also want to make friends...for the long run and actually make sure people benefit from what I have to offer.

So if you can find someone that will both take your money because of the knowledge they possess and keep in mind your intereests as a human, then you should defintely shop around for someone who will be able to teach you both what "you" want to learn, but also a good curriculum thay have come up with over the years that will help you develop musically. It's always good to be able to turn to someone when you need advice and have questions that need answering! And unless you're in your teens, its much harder to find that without taking lessons.

Another good point is that if you can't play it on the acoustic, you have no business trying to make it sound good on the electric with a bunch of effects and noise! Even if it's slayer! You should be able to replicate the tune on an acoustic, so that if there is someting such as noise...it's feedback or something that can be adjusted by a turn of a knob...and not your playing. I've always had a trusty acoustic by my side and would suggest the same for everyone else. Whevever I had a Vai lead or Yngwie lead (when I was younger), I always checked the proficiency of my playing the piece by playing it on the acoustic. It strenghtens you fingers and also shows you immediately what needs to be practiced! Also, you should be able to play your leads and what-not "clean!" That is, without distortion and effects; you should be able to play a passage or a piece of music by just plugging into an amp on the clean channel. If you can't, then it's one more point of focus for you to practice. Although Stevie Ray Vaughn has some basic "overdrive" on his sound, his sound is basically clean!

An acoustic doesn't have to be expensive, as long as it feels good when you play it! Many people are under the notion that a piece of equipment needs to be expensive for it to be good! (I searched for 2 years to find a classical guitar that feels good to me when I play it...I priced guitars from $100.00 all the way up to $15,000.00. After 2 years of scrutinous hunting, it never came down to price, only what feels good in my hands. I ended up paying about $900.00 for a what I consider to be a really nice classical guitar!

When I went shopping for a bass, I had in mind what I wanted...a Fender Precision! But it also took me a year to find the right one for me! When I seached, I searched in quite a few different states...not just my local music stores. I was on a mission... I also took the time to do it that way too. I wouldn't ever suggest buying an instrument online...if you can't have it in your hands when you make the decision, what's the point?

I found my Bass in Rochester, Minnesota and my classical in Virginia Beach. I have an Ibanez RG that I bought about 9 or 10 years ago and a Jackson American I bought about 5 years ago. I have an Ibanez and a Fender, both acoustic electrics. I am completely satisfied with my instruments...no illusions about them.

So the only set back in terms on "play-ability" is me as practitioner. My equipment doesn't hold me back, only I do...if something is "not right" it isn't because of the instruments. What I'm saying here is that excuses are myriad and only reflect the limitations of our imaginations. So let yours roam free my firends!

Well...I believe I've gone on for quite a long time! A little too long many will probably consider. There is much here that is extraneous ranting, and hopefully some good insightful information. So I will once again appologize for the length of my banter. I wish you good luck...if you have any questions, let me know. I'll check back!

Good Luck!

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#8 Post by Brian L. » Sun Nov 14, 2004 10:50 am

The first is know your instrument! In order to have a good idea of what to play, you needs to know what you're playing...namely the notes: what notes a major scale consists of; what notes a minor scale consists of; and how they relate to one another. And just simply "know" all the notes on the neck! You don't need to be able to read music...
Just learn some simple theory, man
Hi KeithH:

I was recently in the same situation as you. I'd like to comment on the posts in the forum based on a quick scan of all the replies. The quotes above by TonyO and The Extremist in my opinion are the most sound advice. I have found an instructional site that is very helpful and I have been recommending this website (www.guitarsecrets.com) and their instructional CD for a few weeks in the forums and I'm going to recommend it again for you. I am getting results beyond my greatest expectations by studying with the Guitar Secrets method. It teaches scales, modes, and theory through to modulation. It covers everything you need to know. I have come up with several original sounding songs in the past month as a result of the lessons, and my knowledge of playing and composing for all instruments has grown enormously. Yes, there are some very beggining basics in the lessons like how to hold your pick but you can skip those if you are already somewhat advanced. Other than that learning how to play and getting very good as a composer and player is just a matter of time once you start heading in the right direction. To get good you have to know your instrument, how the instrument works, and how music works by starting with the basics, otherwise you may be able to shred on a scale and impress people but without the knowledge of how the guitar and music work you will always be stuck. Find a good direction and some instructional material to take you in the right direction, and after a while with some dedication and effort you will start to get good in a very well rounded way( technique, composing, originality etc..) I know this sounds like I am selling or marketing that web site, but imagine if you will playing for close to twenty years and always getting stuck like I was, and then one day you find a teacher online with an instructional CD that makes it all clear and whammo you grow like you never imagined. Thats where this is coming from in addition to my passion for playing and wanting to be helpful to other people who are into it as much as I am. I can't guarantee that the site will be helpful to you, but it has helped me. What I am finding is that you get back what you put into it and that starting at the beggining is the only way to do it. Good Luck getting Unstuck!

I also have an RG2550EX (Blue). Sure is a sweet Guitar. I love it!

Good Luck and Patience,
--Brian

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#9 Post by markelia » Sun Nov 14, 2004 4:09 pm

TonyO, thanks for the interesting bio.

To the person who started this thread, I think you need to be a little more dedicated if you want to raise the level of your playing. Just noodling around on a song probably won't increase your ability too much. Take a few lessons, or get some info on scale/arpeggio/chord shapes, and get Powertab so you can start learning some more songs and stuff. Do stuff you enjoy, so it doesn't feel like a pain in the ass. Have fun!

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#10 Post by j.arledge » Sun Nov 14, 2004 6:20 pm

yes it takes time to be good at anything and guitar is no exception. for some it comes better than others but it takes time and practice.

i would recommend buying a scale book and memorizing it front to back

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/g=h ... id/902870/

and some instructinal dvds like these

http://www.music123.com/Rockhouse-Learn ... 6177.music

http://www.music123.com/Rockhouse-Learn ... 6179.music



and if at all possible take lessions local. most music stores give lessons or know someone who can give lessons.

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#11 Post by kpxmikey89 » Sun Nov 14, 2004 6:54 pm

haha! ur really funny
u have a nice Ibanez RG tho, but im only 15, playing for just 4 years


but i think u shoudl try this

step1: try practicing unplugged with a dunlop pick about between medium to thick 1.0

2: find an artist u like, and listen to their songs over and over again whenever u get the chance (my method is to hear the song before u learn how to play it)

3: use power tab editer, download the song files after u have listen to the songs in mp3 or cd's, and just follow the notes on it, but odnt play it yet

4: print it out, and circle or highlight the chops, or riffs that really stood out from teh composition, or u thougth it was hard and u wanted to nail it through

5: memorize those riffs and learn how to apply in any given key

6: there u have just nailed a song, (not those emo-chord-based songs, songs like vai's for the love of god, i would love to, whispering a prayer, etc..)

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#12 Post by u2 » Sun Nov 14, 2004 7:22 pm

learn the notes on the fretboard...it helps quite a bit and than when you learn more music thoery....learn cirle of fifths

btw music theory is just a nessecity ( sp ) so many people out day like SLash , billy shee , stevie ray can't read music. But of course...studying music theory gives you a big boost in understanding.

I think you have to increase the amount of time playing yout guitar maybe start with 1 hr everyday. Get a teacher to correct your mistakes like picking habits and stuff,

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#13 Post by j.arledge » Sun Nov 14, 2004 9:13 pm

i try to play at least an hour a day and usually play 2 but you need to at least have an hour a day of good playing


reading music is not a necessity but it really helps . I play with my schools jazz band and we do a few different things like some blues and old school rock but some of the stuff doesn't have chords printed out and so i always have to have some one tell me the chord progressions and it is sort of intimidating and an inconvience. When we get new music i am always impressed at how the small brass section can just see it and do it, the same goes with paino(spelling?) i would love to be able to play bach or moltzart stuff but it is sort of hard when you dont know how to read music.

as a beginner it is really important to know your scales and know what every note is one the fret board on every string. If you do it makes things easy like chord building and then taking the chords and chord progressions and making solos that follow the progressions in the right scales or modes. Once you have that you are ready to make your own stuff and be in a band and be great

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#14 Post by TonyO » Mon Nov 15, 2004 1:40 am

Since some have suggested getting a book, my all time favorite is The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer. This book has all the tools needed by beginner and intermediate players and I often reference the book. I bought mine about 14 years ago, and since then it has received 2 revisions. I just bought the most recent version for a friend of mine who has been playing a couple years, but has only recently started getting serious. He loves it!

Also, for now as a beginner, I would stay away from the "Guitar Grimoire". It can be very daunting to begining theorists...once you have a good understanding of music theory, and you find you might want to be challenged a little more or find your need a bigger reference or companion guide, then, and only then would I suggest getting the "Grimoire". Besides, the Grimoire only gives you a bunch of patterns and scales and modes and really doesn't allow you to learn the "why" part of it. It is mainly for memorizing...it is a good book, but only for advanced guitarists who are comfortable with their instruments and who already have a good understanding of theory in general.

Jra2217 mentioned some difficutly that he experienced regarding reading music for his jazz namd. I first started playing music in the 2nd grade and played a number of different band instruments before seriously playing the guitar. I had a basic understandnig of music theory, and like many people, I was one of those people who used to actually "write" the notes for many of the passages I had to play. Most of the time, after I wrote out all the notes, I ended up memorizing the piece so I didn't have to look t the notes. I was eventually able to read fairly fluently, but not like most wind instrumentalists.

As it turns out..this is not a bad thing at all, especially for guitar players, although it is very beneficial to be able to read certain melodic passages or melodic lines (leads), especially in a jazz environment. At the time, when I had to write out the notes, I found it extremely embarrassing. Later, however, I found this to be quite common practice, especially in a jazz ensemble. Even in rock bands...as long as all the muscians are on the "same page" with their theory.

In other words, to wind instrumentssince are more melodic instruments since they can only play one note at a time; they rely on a string of notes running horizontally on a musical staff, as opposed to guitars which are more harmonic or chordal instruments, since we rely more on chords, thus, we rely on notes running vertically on a staff (to form chords). As such, when we musicians substitute the notes for the "letters" we call this "charting" a song.

We only need to know what chords are occurring or what the chord changes are throughout a bar or measure etc. So if the notes in a bar represent the key of G major, we simply write "G" over that bar. If it's G minor, we write it "Gm". There are symbals that represent major, minor, diminished and augmented. So, a "Gm Maj7 b5" would be a G minor chord with a major 7 and a flat 5, or Gminor major 7 flat five. Anything major may be signified by a triangle...minor is just a small "m", diminished is represended by a small circle in the upper right hand corner, just as the symbal for temperature "degrees" and augmented is represented by a plus sign.

Well, since you guys are fairly attentive, I'll give you the following little tool:

1.) a major scale, as we know, consists of 8 notes = 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,1
or C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C.

2.) We find the chord of "any" scale (major, minor, hormonic minor and melodic minor) or mode (animal, vegetable or mineral) by refering to the degrees (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,1) of the scale.

So to find the first chord, we use this pattern "ALL THE TIME!"
1,3,5 or First, Third and Fifth.

So, the first chord in the key of C major or in a C major scale will consist of the notes CEG, the second chord will be DFA, the third will be EGB etc.,

The degrees of a major scale also have names 1=Ionian, 2=Dorian, 3=Phrygian, 4= Lydian, 5-Mixolydian, 6=Aeolian, 7=Locrian.

By using the 1,3,5 pattern, we are able to find out all the known chords of any scale no matter what it is. This is also how we find out what notes are in a 7th chord or a 9th Chord, or a 13 for that matter, and it's all by keeping the stepping pattern of thirds! So, 1,3,5,7,9,11,13 etc... But before you run, you must crawl, which means, you need to know about the minor 7 as opposed to the major 7 in order to make a nine chord, and since that's a horse of a different color...I'll save it for a different discussion.

Anyway, to successfully chart out a song for your jazz band, you first off need to know what key the song is in! After that, its prettymuch all down hill...unless you're playing "real" jazz...whereby, you'll need to know the big chrods. Nevert the less, you should still be able to substitute such "big" chords for little chords. So, instead of playing a nine, you can many times play a 7 chord. Either way, the key of the song and the arrangement of the notes will let you know exactly "which" chords (or rather which "notes" you can play (and which notes you shouldn't play).

To get a really good grasp on this concept, I would suggest going to your band instructor and having him or her help you get familiarized with being able to "chart songs". That's "your" teacher! And probably, a good one...you may even be able to swindle some extra credit out of it. Also, talk with some of the other bandmates...preferably a really cute blonde! But that was my preference! But even if you find someone who isn't that good looking, as long as you find someone to help hone your theory for free, it' all that counts! And that's all I really cared about. I had a couple different girls from band who helped me out when I got stuck. It's another option. And even if you don't get a really good looking one, if she helps you, that's all that counts, besides, it really doesn't matter how bad she looks, as long as you're getting to know you're theory. Besides, getting a knob job from someone who isn't completely beautiful isn't that bad, after all you'd be looking at the back of her head!

Good Luck!

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#15 Post by KeithH » Mon Nov 15, 2004 1:58 am

Theres some great ideas on here, but that last bit from TonyO about Phrygian modal extra terrestrial abcdzxqwmz is going right over my head.

I only have around 30 minutes 2-3 days per week to practise, I am an accountant with a lot of clients and dont get home until 7pm, so I am basically just too tired and busy with other stuff to practise more than that.

Its Catch 22 isnt it ? Because I suck it is difficult to stick at it. but if I dont I won't get any better ! I just try to do what I can.

I know the notes on the neck but not by heart, and I can jam along with a few songs.

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