Music Theory, where do I start?

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TimeMachine
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I want to learn music theory, but I dont know where to start, what should I learn first? What part of music theory should I cover? What scales should I learn first?

I know my basic chords A-G Minor and Major. I'm currently studing the staff, so I could be a better sight reader.

can anybody help, I'm just a beginner at music theory and need to know just the basics and nothing confusing. If there is a web-site that could help me, please post it.

Thank you.
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Big Bad Bill
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Why don't you start with the major scales and their relative minors-that way you'll know why you can play a tune in C major and yet an A minor scale and have it sound 'right'!

It's also a nice amount to learn-not too much not too little!

If you're learning to read the staff remember to get accustomed to reading ledger lines (above and below the staff)-this is my weakness!
TimeMachine
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So There is Scales that run throught A-G in both Minor and Major.
Knyq
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www.cyberfret.com has a lot of helpful things.. especially for beginning music theory.
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Ricardo
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Learn the circle of 5ths and key relationships. This means memorizing the 5th intervals, (or order of sharps) and 4th intervals in the other direction (order of flats). Pretty much all theory is easy to grasp once you get a handle on the circle of 5ths.

Ricardo
TimeMachine
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Ricardo wrote:Learn the circle of 5ths and key relationships. This means memorizing the 5th intervals, (or order of sharps) and 4th intervals in the other direction (order of flats). Pretty much all theory is easy to grasp once you get a handle on the circle of 5ths.

Ricardo
I read about the circle of 5ths, its so fucking hard. expecially on the net, they just didnt give me enough detail and was written lazy, too confusing for me. I need a book that will give detail about everything, even go beyond detail.
Super_Turd
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I teach Guitar -

I would suggest if youve covered no musc theory at all, is to start with intervals(interval meens distance in pitch) and hoiw to instantly spot an interval on the neck.
This opens up so many doors. It allows you to read chord charts, it allows you to build your own chords, it allows you to build scales and TONES of stuff.

Bascially go to a music shop and ask for a book on bsaic music theory FOR GUITAR.

Then after you complete the book - (if its good! - thats very important that everyone recormends the book), you should have a good base platform where u can go in all sorts of directions.

Ok, if u cant find a gd enuff book, the simplest thing to do is find a teacher and ask him to specifically teach u theory and see what he has to say.

Todd ;)
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oh - and also, learning to read is good, but if ure just starting theory, i wouldnt have it top on the priority list, but its somewhere...

;)
Todd
TimeMachine
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thats for the advice super turd, but I went to the little black dots that steve vai has in his web-site. The book he recomends, I think I'm going to buy them at the book store barnes and nobles.

Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry
Garners Reeds "Music Notation"

Nicolas Slonimsky Thesarus of Scales and Melodic Patterns (Text)

and other books I thought that were good, tell me if they are good picks.

Guitar Grimore Scales and Modes
Norton Manual of Notation


what do you think about the books I'm going to buy Superturd and anybody else who views this. Are they a good selection and would it really help me improve my theory and knowledge in music. Also they gave them good reviews,.
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Big Bad Bill
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I'd slightly disagree with Super Turd! I think guitar theory books teach the ideas in such a twisted way that it becomes confusing. The authors are always trying to make everything completely relevent to guitar that they lose the plot (and the reader). I just jumped into music theory totally divorced from any instrument. This tends to be classically orientated by its nature, but then I find classical theoreticians by far the most able!

That's just my experience as someone who was in exactly your position-a raw beginner in theory- a few months ago.

Oh and be prepared for some tough memorization!
TimeMachine
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Big Bad Bill wrote:I'd slightly disagree with Super Turd! I think guitar theory books teach the ideas in such a twisted way that it becomes confusing. The authors are always trying to make everything completely relevent to guitar that they lose the plot (and the reader). I just jumped into music theory totally divorced from any instrument. This tends to be classically orientated by its nature, but then I find classical theoreticians by far the most able!

That's just my experience as someone who was in exactly your position-a raw beginner in theory- a few months ago.

Oh and be prepared for some tough memorization!
yeah, I know its pretty hard to know where all the notes are on the staff and to play them quickly. It'll be hard, but well worth it.
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Big Bad Bill
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I guess when it comes down to it, learning any theory will always help somewhere down the line!

Non-classical musicians are an odd bunch being so wary and/or poor at learning theory. Can you imagine a poet, playwrite or journalist being unable to read and write, never mind not knowing the rules of grammar? Actually, strike 'journalist' off that list, they do manage without basic literacy skills! :lol:

Good luck and keep at it! Join a night class if you can-the encouragement you get from your peers is very helpful.
spcastlemagic
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Make sure you know where to find any note on the guitar on any string , and as previously stated, learn about intervals. This will enable you to play scales outside of box shapes, and easily come up with your own chord voicings. The names of scales and chords are based around the intervals included, so I can't think of a better place from where to start.
anikilador
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With a teacher :D
DeViaTo
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TimeMachine wrote:I want to learn music theory, but I dont know where to start, what should I learn first? What part of music theory should I cover? What scales should I learn first?

I know my basic chords A-G Minor and Major. I'm currently studing the staff, so I could be a better sight reader.

can anybody help, I'm just a beginner at music theory and need to know just the basics and nothing confusing. If there is a web-site that could help me, please post it.

Thank you.
well what i suggest is: go out and find a really good teacher.
he needs to be a good player (expecially live) and a good speaker: he's supposed to know how explain best to you the theory and everything concerning music :-)

good luck :-)

gigi
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