Chord Functions - All There Really Is Is I and V

Discuss playing styles and techniques, or share your own here.
Bakerman
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I definitely understand modes and it's pretty clear the answer can be either A or B (and therefore C; you need more info). Please explain why that situation couldn't be an I vamp in D Mixolydian.
theox
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I THINK YOU PEOPLE THINK TOO MUCH

How much theory do you need to know in order to make music?

How important is it to spend hours and hours here arguing instead of being somewhere playing and actually learning something and applying that 'huge knowledge' (pun intended)?
smj
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Not to completely de-rail this thread....

Brainpolice is in the "wow" stage of his musical academic life. He's going to school...learning all kinds of harmonic concepts....everything is like..."wow..." He's in the "I know more than I can play" stage.

When you have all of this knowledge, it's very easy to fancy yourself above most other mortal musicians. I actually believed when I was going to Berklee, "wait til audiences get a load of my use of non functional multitonic system progressions....surely I'll get signed to a record label then."

The reality is (I've found) is that people really don't care if you superimpose b13's over maj7 chords, or ruptured 128ths over minor 7 chords. They want to feel something. If your music isn't touching them, they won't listen.

All the jazz, and classical players that are talked about in the classroom lived the music they played. They didn't take 4 years of classes and become the geniuses they were. They were geniuses because they had artistic vision, imagination....and their music engaged audiences. The music was in their ears and in their heart....not just in their brain.

Anyway Brainpolice, as someone who cares I suggest you stop digging the hole deeper for yourself....you've made your point. People are entitled to disagree and criticize your ideas and your music...get over it and move on.

Sean Meredith-Jones

http://www.seanmeredithjones.com
brainpolice
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Thats all fine and dandy. But the oxymoron of this is that this is my thread, and then people tell me to back off when they are the ones getting fired up on my thread in the first place. Thats a complete paradox. I had someone try to call me out with "come back when you know all your modes" which was completely ridicolous as i replied with more modes and concepts then necessary. I think the "theory bigotry" kind of goes the other way here, with ppl trying to pass me off as a lunatic that doesn't have a single clue what he's rattling on about, when they themselves aren't well read in the subject matter in the first place.
"Brainpolice is in the "wow" stage of his musical academic life. He's going to school...learning all kinds of harmonic concepts....everything is like..."wow..." He's in the "I know more than I can play" stage."
I'll humor you...You must be in the "I'm a mature and settled musician now, with advice from my vast amount of experience for everyone" stage.
"When you have all of this knowledge, it's very easy to fancy yourself above most other mortal musicians. I actually believed when I was going to Berklee, "wait til audiences get a load of my use of non functional multitonic system progressions....surely I'll get signed to a record label then."
If you really think theres an ego thing going on, you're wrong. I'd say theres more of an ego thing going on with people (not you) who try to call other people out and get stomped with a friggin book.
"The reality is (I've found) is that people really don't care if you superimpose b13's over maj7 chords, or ruptured 128ths over minor 7 chords. They want to feel something. If your music isn't touching them, they won't listen."
I agree with you completely. But that's not what this thread is supposed to be about. This thread was a "generalization" on my behalf, if you will, that happened to get a hefty amount of disagreement. It turned into a whole slew of things. I still am bothered by many peoples view of modality...as their view of it isnt modal (lol) but it's actually "chord scales". And when it comes to chord scales, i agree with everything they say. But there is a blatant difference between chord scales in tonal music, and modal music.
"All the jazz, and classical players that are talked about in the classroom lived the music they played. They didn't take 4 years of classes and become the geniuses they were. They were geniuses because they had artistic vision, imagination....and their music engaged audiences. The music was in their ears and in their heart....not just in their brain."
I agree with you again, but what does that have to do with this thread? This isn't a "does theory really help?" thread. :P
"Anyway Brainpolice, as someone who cares I suggest you stop digging the hole deeper for yourself....you've made your point. People are entitled to disagree and criticize your ideas and your music...get over it and move on."
If anything, other people have been digging my hole for me. But i already established a graveyard beforehand. :)
shader
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smj wrote:Not to completely de-rail this thread....
The reality is (I've found) is that people really don't care if you superimpose b13's over maj7 chords, or ruptured 128ths over minor 7 chords. They want to feel something. If your music isn't touching them, they won't listen.
That's really the most important thing. Few guitar players have impressed me as much as Vai has, and it's not because they can't approach him on a technical or musical level - people like Greg Howe could probably eat him for breakfast, but their music just doesn't touch me the way Vai's does.
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burnt out
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theox wrote

How much theory do you need to know in order to make music?
:D just e'nuff...

Just e'nuff to where it all becomes second nature and you can forget it all and just play and express yourself creatively and naturally. :P

If you know what that feeling is like then you are on your way.

If you don't then you probably haven't delved deeply enough into theory yet to get there.Alot of people give up on theory before they even get there.These would be the same people who rail against theory and say that it stifle's their creativity. :lol:

If you are playing from a playbook then it hasn't become second nature to you yet.It'll probably sound stiff and unimaginative.But hang in there untill it's second nature to you and...then you'll be free.
Last edited by burnt out on Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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burnt out
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theox wrote:
How important is it to spend hours and hours here arguing instead of being somewhere playing and actually learning something and applying that 'huge knowledge' (pun intended)?
:lol: hahaha,so true!
Super_Turd
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peace
Mr_Guitarman
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I do understand what brain police is saying. All through his ideas seem very radical compared to some of our own we shouldn't get angry. If you look at different chords in a progression the only chords that have real functions in a piece are one and five. I don't agree that those are the only two chords that exist but I get his point. I also believe that if Vai said it, it might be more widly accepted. I am currently studying theory and there are so many things. There are also so many things that may not apply to most modern music. We must not forget that theory isn't law and theory follows practice( my teacher always says this). Also he explains that there are really no such things as modes of Harmonic minor scales. I don't have to agree but I try to understand his point. Just like we should all do in this situation. Also poeple should stop arguing over who knows more theory than who becuase there is always someone who knows more and in there eyes some maybe exposing there ignorance.

Peace to all
brainpolice
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Thankyou. That was the most controlled and decent reply on this thread so far. One thing, im not saying harmonic modes don't exist. What i said is that not all of them are stable. The 4th and 5th modes are the most obviously stable ones. Yes, you can use any harmonic mode you want, but my ear tells me that when i try to play certain other modes of harmonic minor that it isn't very stable (mostly due to that augmented 2nd). "We must not forget that theory isn't law and theory follows practice( my teacher always says this)." You're right. Theory is just what it's called: theory!
:)
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