When to use scales such as melodic minor, harmonic minor,etc

Discuss playing styles and techniques, or share your own here.
Super_Turd
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DeViaTo wrote:
Super_Turd wrote:
DeViaTo wrote: well this is IMHO a little semplicistic (is that word correct in english?)!
well ok they're the same note in this case, but you may want to put more enphasis on certain notes (i mean the triad) so you can say you are playing "modal".... :-P

but let's see the chord progression that way... it's a blues, where the key is E, A is the V degree and F#min7 (i suppose it's F#m7 and not Fm7 as you wrote).
well in this case you will play E mixolidian over E, change scale to Epentatonic/Eblues over A ! ... so what is i play F# dorian scale over F#min7? :-)

gigi
Wooops!!! my bad i forgot the put F#m7 on those examples. by mistake i put F. errr plzzz if u try that out makesure u play f#m7 sori boot that.


hey

whats imho??

"it's a blues, where the key is E, A is the V degree and F#min7" <-- B is the 5th of E, not A.

and the thing in my first post i wrote out wasnt a blues, it was a simple loop. E was the root F#m7 is a diatonic niebour to the rout and A is the 4th diatonic movement.

Is there somthing you dont understand cos i dont quite get what ure saying exactly in ure post, but if ure saying what i thnk ure saying then, Yes you can use e pentatonic on them, but i was just talking about modes and the way to use them the most obvious way. obviously theres no such thing as a wrong sclae for any chord, its just the effect of the scale over that chord, for example

if u play A major and u play A Locrian over it (7th mode) it will sound pretty damn weird. Maybe you want this effect? i dont know. but before u do that and start using otther scales in combination, id recormend getting the modes of the major scale down first in the way they are 'meant to be used' or most commonly used, then experiment.

I may have just understood ure question wrong but jst let me know

Todd
right A is the 4th degree... my mistake ;P when you write fast it can happen ;P

what I try to say is that it's reductive to think in terms on just one scale...
start playing E mixolidian, when the progression goes to A you can add some lydian flavour so that you have played 2 scales ...
i hope to be more clear this time...
even if you have a diatonic chord progression, it doesn't mean you have to play the same scale and then give 'em different names!

and what happens if you have a non-diatonic chord progression?

:-P

gigi

How would playing an E mixolydian over an A chord give a lydian sound/colour???

lydian is a #4 sound, and when u play E mixolydian over an A you can hear NOT A LYDIAN but u CAN hear AMAJOR!.

You may have like misswriten this or somthing but nvm.

Of course playing an a major over the A chord will give a different sound.

Emaj over an A chord = Alydian
Amajor over an A chord = Amajor


Lisnt my point of view is getting distorted here. I totally belive in playing off the chords, i think it is VITAL when improvising to describe that chord as best as you can! What i am trying to say here is this:-

WHEN THE CHORDS ARE DIATIONIC, WHY PLAY DIFFERENT SCALES OVER THEM WHICH GIVE THE SAME FLAVOUR/SOUND.

Of course when im playing over some chord progressions, i dont round the whole song up into a single scale. Unless the song was all diatonic (what a boaring song.....) and i wanted to boar everyone by JUST playing 'in the box' stuff, id never do that.

As ive said in another post, im trying to show people how to play in the box with all the falvours of the modes of the major scale, but simpler.

(im not trying to pat myself on the back here, but) The way i play chords is i dont miss out on any flavours/sounds/colour.

Asi have said in another post, only once u learn to play in the box can you play out of it.

i really hope this clears things up.

ps, players such as joe pass, emily remler, vinny moore, frank gambale, joe satriani, and im sure there are others, think in a similer way with chords and modes.


Ok, if any1 has any problems with this way....... thats ure oppinion!, but do let me know cos im still interested.


Todd :wink:
DeViaTo
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DeViaTo wrote:
Super_Turd wrote:
what I try to say is that it's reductive to think in terms on just one scale...
start playing E mixolidian, when the progression goes to A you can add some lydian flavour so that you have played 2 scales ...

gigi

How would playing an E mixolydian over an A chord give a lydian sound/colour???

lydian is a #4 sound, and when u play E mixolydian over an A you can hear NOT A LYDIAN but u CAN hear AMAJOR!.

You may have like misswriten this or somthing but nvm.

Of course playing an a major over the A chord will give a different sound.

Emaj over an A chord = Alydian
Amajor over an A chord = Amajor
well i do think my english is bad... but not that bad :-)

if I say add some lydian flavours... and then you played 2 scales, it will mean that you have to change scale (notes are slightly different)
don't you think? :-)

gigi
Knyq
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hmm... these are some interesting responses.. but they have gotten a bit off of the original subject.


i think some of you are making modes much more complicated than they should be.


but back on to the actual topic.... can someone list the modes for harmonic minor and melodic minor (and if u feel like it, the chords that each can be used over). thanks
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