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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 6:05 am 
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Hey guys, I'm trying to get better at cross-string tapping but it's a slow process, and I'm having trouble muting the strings effectively while doing it.
Has anyone got any tips at how to get better/more efficient at it and perhaps some practice licks?
Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 7:32 am 
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I'd love to hear some tips for string muting, it annoys the hell out of me.

Have you tried putting an elastic band over the strings just before the nut? That's good for muting the other strings when tapping. like http://farm1.static.flickr.com/47/148857209_529fcb8604.jpg but at the '0' fret so to speak....


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 7:42 am 
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Yeah, I've got a hair bobble across the top of the fretboard to help mute strings but they still tend to ring out and ping quite a bit, which is bloody annoying to say the least :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 8:24 am 
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Hmmm I still find that as well....:)


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 9:22 am 
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Arr "To hair band or not to hair band, that is the question." :D

I think the best way to improve accuracy is to go slow. It really is the best method to see what you are doing & how you are doing it.

In some cases you can actually use the ring out stings to an advantage. Yet in other cases you really don't need it to pinging out.

The hair band method is a great & all my favorite players use it. Not many have a locking nut though.

Both hands can be used to mute tapping lines. Left hand (fret hand) & picking hand. Takes practise taking feedback from your strings & fretboard.

Try & take two strings to begin with.

h(E) T12-----------8th------5th
(G) T12-----------7th------5th

Going this way is easier than the reverse so afterwards try that. I know it's a tiny simple example but it's the little things that make up the larger capabilities.

Then maybe a scale....like....err....A Major.
-(D)---6th--7th----T9
L(E)-- 5th--7th----T9
etc....

Noitce both examples have one string skip. Then it's just a case of elaborating & experimentation.

One trick that Guthrie taught me was a mute using the right hand. Holding the pick between thumb & index, this leaves the middle & ring finger with nothing to do. Until you put them on a pair of strings. Say you tap the open B, you would put the fingers left on the high E & G. Try it. It's not used all the time but can come in handy when needed.

This whole mute subject is a large one.


Last edited by Stephen Brown on Fri May 22, 2009 11:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 3:20 am 
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Seems to be... it would be easier with a fixed or non floyd bridge methinks.... :?


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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 9:17 am 
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2.15. Has a locking nut to my surprise.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?hl=en&v=J8Mlqaw3ego&gl=US


Last edited by Stephen Brown on Tue Jun 02, 2009 8:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2009 1:46 pm 
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I'm a believer in trying/playing/practicing all sorts of everything,
and I believe that eventually you will be able to utilize it in
some way, whether it's tomarrow, or at some later time down
the road into the future. You might revisit a concept or technique
down the road a year or ten later and then unlock it' usefulness.
So try everything, play everything, practice everything.
I do it in a real lazy way with a total i don't give a crap
attitude myself. But that's just how I roll. It works best for
me that way because then my mind is more attuned to discovery.
It's a kind of an exploration process. Constantly searching, but not
necessarilly working myself to a frazzle.I think if I was too dsiciplined,
then my mind might miss certain things and not spot their usefulness.
So the gain isn't always instantaneous. The light bulb doesn't always come on
right on cue. Wait, what was the question?


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2009 1:11 pm 
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:D Good advice there :D


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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 2:16 pm 
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burnt out wrote:
I'm a believer in trying/playing/practicing all sorts of everything,
and I believe that eventually you will be able to utilize it in
some way, whether it's tomarrow, or at some later time down
the road into the future. You might revisit a concept or technique
down the road a year or ten later and then unlock it' usefulness.
So try everything, play everything, practice everything.
I do it in a real lazy way with a total i don't give a crap
attitude myself. But that's just how I roll. It works best for
me that way because then my mind is more attuned to discovery.
It's a kind of an exploration process. Constantly searching, but not
necessarilly working myself to a frazzle.I think if I was too dsiciplined,
then my mind might miss certain things and not spot their usefulness.
So the gain isn't always instantaneous. The light bulb doesn't always come on
right on cue. Wait, what was the question?


You know, I'd actually agree with you. I'm very, very much the same way. People always say this whole thing about if you wanna be good you have to knuckle down and practice rigidly 24/7, but I find I learn much quicker by taking it at my own lazy pace.
Thanks for the info dude, good to see I'm not the only one! :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 2:26 pm 
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I feel that provided the foundation is correct, practise makes perfect.

Let's face it though. Guitar players are doing more in this generation than ever before. Technique & effects wise. Multi tapping all over the neck wasn't around in Buddy Holly's day. I'm not sure how old ring modulation is either but that's of recent times to.

First ring modulation? "Voice of the Daleks in the television series Doctor Who, starting in 1963."

History of tapping....(Needs some elaboration)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapping


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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 8:50 pm 
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Quote:
Multi tapping all over the neck wasn't around in Buddy Holly's day.


And that's a good thing I think.
It gives us something else to listen to
and be inspired by, so that we don't all
end up doing all of the same things
and approaching music the same exact way
all the time. And there's alot of stuff inbetween
Buddy Holly and the stuff happening today
so we can all go in alot of different directions. I mean
there's alot available. We don't all have to all make
music with the exact same cookie cutter approach.
There's nothing wrong with being a slowhand or
a fasthand or a moderate-hand. As long as it
sounds good then who cares. Good singers
have value too, and I don't think alot of them
are able to sing over alot metal or guitar music where
the guitar is setting the finger speed record
all the time, at every opportunity.
It might happen sometimes, but it shouldn't
be EXPECTED every time. It's just unrealistic.
Which is something that alot of teenagers
probably aren't really thinking about. We
all want the most slamming music all the time
when we're younger, but miss alot of cool
stuff because of that hot rod gunslinger attitude.
Mellow can be damn cool too. Variety rules.
Cookie cutters don't really cut it. It's like
too much of one spice. It spoils the whole meal.


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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 2:37 pm 
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what_a_cool_username wrote:
burnt out wrote:
I'm a believer in trying/playing/practicing all sorts of everything,
and I believe that eventually you will be able to utilize it in
some way, whether it's tomarrow, or at some later time down
the road into the future. You might revisit a concept or technique
down the road a year or ten later and then unlock it' usefulness.
So try everything, play everything, practice everything.
I do it in a real lazy way with a total i don't give a crap
attitude myself. But that's just how I roll. It works best for
me that way because then my mind is more attuned to discovery.
It's a kind of an exploration process. Constantly searching, but not
necessarilly working myself to a frazzle.I think if I was too dsiciplined,
then my mind might miss certain things and not spot their usefulness.
So the gain isn't always instantaneous. The light bulb doesn't always come on
right on cue. Wait, what was the question?


You know, I'd actually agree with you. I'm very, very much the same way. People always say this whole thing about if you wanna be good you have to knuckle down and practice rigidly 24/7, but I find I learn much quicker by taking it at my own lazy pace.
Thanks for the info dude, good to see I'm not the only one! :lol:


It all snowballs.
And then once you have a snowball you can keep rolling it in the snow and it just gets bigger and bigger.
You start with nothing, but eventually you can build a snowman.

Or a guitar man... :guitar

Hmmm...I think I'm gonna build one of those next winter...


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2009 10:23 pm 
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Playing them in isolation is one thing. Playing them in a song is another & then playing them live is another.

I surpose it's a build up of building blocks.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 12:19 pm 
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What sort of lesson would anyone find handy on this topic?


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