Learning the modes

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bkeds
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Hi, i've been playing guitar self taught for 4 years now and I've decided to finally learn the all the modes, in every key, in every position. I'm wondering the best way to go about this and if anyone has any links or tips to help?
Stephen Brown
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Although the internet is a abundance of information it can sometimes be overwhealming. Be it full of great information or some really rather bad.

In all truth it's a mindfield out there. It goes the same with books also. Chord
books that can show you 1000 1 chords. Same goes for scale books. Some are great & some are just cashing in on....the guitar.

It does seem in recet years (last 25years lets say) that a type of guitar standard has emerged. Your notice that guitar school's have made use of these standards. CAGED system, three note's per sting postions. Which are the modes & arn't at the same time. Yes... hectic.

Books are really great learning tools but nothing,nothing beats a good teacher. You can literally take years off of your personal struggles in understanding.

Now'a'days everyone learns the notes in row method but hardly anyone learns the notes in their proper context. This is why I would recommend a teacher. To help you de-code the sum of things.

I'm still waiting for my books to talk to me. Having a conversation with a TV screen isn't that great either.

For some reason I thought Charlie Parker taught Miles Davis. He did.
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burnt out
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Just learn the MAJOR SCALE all across (and up and down) the entire fretboard in all Keys.

Then you will know all of the notes and all of the patterns for all of the modes.
Stephen Brown
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burnt out wrote:Just learn the MAJOR SCALE all across (and up and down) the entire fretboard in all Keys.

Then you will know all of the notes and all of the patterns for all of the modes.
Say he/she learns the above. Of course in the end one arrives at the question of...."Now what." No clue with which chords to assign in relation to tonal choices. I think the key is knowing your intervals in relation to your good given advice.

It has to be one of the largest pitt falls in playing. Playing is one things but unlocking & opening up your choices, thus setting yourself free. That's another.

Hence why a teacher is such a help.
Svelt Pen
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I think it's very difficult to find quality guitar teachers...I've never been able to find one. The first one I ever went to, I asked to show me some Hendrix and he refused, stating that Hendrix was just a ni**er with a guitar...The next one I went to tried to force me to read music and play old one note etudes that were the most boring and uninspiring things I ever practiced. Another one was a Vai freak who wouldn't show me anything other than Vai licks...SO, as you can tell, I've been turned off of the whole guitar teacher thing...there are many many incredible self taught players out there, and there is a lot of great info in books, DVD's, and online. It's overwhelming, but if you actually sit down and write out what your goals are as a player, then it's not too hard to find out what you need to learn and in what order. This is just my own opinion based on personal experience... That being said, check out these great lessons!:

Satriani lesson on modes part 1:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA

Satriani lesson on modes part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCdZwASSKuk

OLD Satriani vids on scales and arpeggios, theory etc....Priceless advice:

http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=s ... itesearch=#

http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=s ... itesearch=#

Also, buy his Guitar Secrets book...It's full of great exercises and modal stuff that will keep you busy for a long time...I may seem like I'm biased towards Satch, but his lessons have helped me improve my musicianship tremendously over the past few years...If I could add though, that he offered another gem of information recently that I think all players should do when practicing scales, and that is to sing the scale notes as you play them...It really helps you to internalize the sound of a scale so you can forget about fingerings, and focus on playing the scale anywhere on the neck without stumbling...Sing the interval names forwards and backwards, then mix up the orders and test yourself. Also sing the note names themsleves. One thing with learning modes IMO is that you should focus more on learning them in a parallel fashion (off of one root..G Ionian, G Dorian, G Phrygian etc...), as opposed to relative (G Ionian, A Dorian, B Phrygian etc...), unless you enjoy playing the same 7 notes OVER and OVER again..lol. Consider signing up at the forums at ibreathemusic.com. A lot of guys over there are very experienced and can answer any guitar related question. Good luck!
dthodoris
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As stated above, the best way to learn the modes and everything else on music, is to find a good teacher and start taking lessons! A good teacher can point you to the right direction which is how to use modes in a musical context and not just learn the notes on the fretboard :)
Svelt Pen
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dthodoris wrote:As stated above, the best way to learn the modes and everything else on music, is to find a good teacher and start taking lessons! A good teacher can point you to the right direction which is how to use modes in a musical context and not just learn the notes on the fretboard :)
I have to respectfully disagree...I'm a self taught advanced level player, and I found all I needed to know on the net, in DVD's, and books, as well as from jamming with others and along to CD's of course. Teachers are human...They don't always have the answers you are looking for, and a lot of them are self taught... People tend to put them on a pedestal because they have the "teacher" title, but that doesn't really mean much...I'm not discouraging you to look for one by any means, but just know that learning on your own can be equally as effective.
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burnt out
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FRETPICK wrote:
burnt out wrote:Just learn the MAJOR SCALE all across (and up and down) the entire fretboard in all Keys.

Then you will know all of the notes and all of the patterns for all of the modes.
Say he/she learns the above. Of course in the end one arrives at the question of...."Now what." No clue with which chords to assign in relation to tonal choices. I think the key is knowing your intervals in relation to your good given advice.

It has to be one of the largest pitt falls in playing. Playing is one things but unlocking & opening up your choices, thus setting yourself free. That's another.

Hence why a teacher is such a help.
I chose not to go there on purpose.

One step at a time.

I answered the question asked as clearly as I could. I saw no need to offer him/her extra information before he/she was ready, which would have only made him/her ask more questions.

More questions and more answers are another step.

No sense in getting ahead of the current step one is on.

:roll:
dthodoris
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Svelt Pen wrote:
I have to respectfully disagree...I'm a self taught advanced level player, and I found all I needed to know on the net, in DVD's, and books, as well as from jamming with others and along to CD's of course. Teachers are human...They don't always have the answers you are looking for, and a lot of them are self taught... People tend to put them on a pedestal because they have the "teacher" title, but that doesn't really mean much...I'm not discouraging you to look for one by any means, but just know that learning on your own can be equally as effective.
I can see your point my friend!And i agree that there is all you need out there (after all music theory is relatively small and for every technique there is at least a dozen of DVDs available).But that doesnt mean that one should discard the option of a good teacher.In my opinion a student should be aware of all this educational material that is available but still needs someone to guide him/her through this chaos of books, DVD's etc.Also, consider a 10-15 year old kid.Do you think such a kid can actually be self taught?Kids at that age are easily impressed by things that may not turn to be that impressive after some years.A good teacher can also hear you playing and can tell you a prof. opinion.DVD's cant!

Also the fact that you (and some others as well) reached an advanced level of playing being self taught , doesnt mean that this is the rule.In addidtion, a good teacher (even a self taught one!) has made this 'journey' long before the student and can deffinitely tell him/her what to avoid and what to insist on studying.A teacher is a person that has learned from experience through years and years of playing.

Of course we can debate on what is a good teacher and how many of them are available in someone's city/town...

I dont want to persuade you about this, you have your opinion which i respect but consider these things i said and tell me what you think
dthodoris
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burnt out wrote:
More questions and more answers are another step.

No sense in getting ahead of the current step one is on.

:roll:
Sorry my friend but i disagree with that! Knowing the next steps is very important especially in situations where you get tired of studying something and you wonder 'whats the point ??' Somebody should know his goals, and how the steps he needs to take are helping towards them.

**Sorry but my english kind of sucks :lol:
Svelt Pen
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dthodoris wrote:
Svelt Pen wrote:
I have to respectfully disagree...I'm a self taught advanced level player, and I found all I needed to know on the net, in DVD's, and books, as well as from jamming with others and along to CD's of course. Teachers are human...They don't always have the answers you are looking for, and a lot of them are self taught... People tend to put them on a pedestal because they have the "teacher" title, but that doesn't really mean much...I'm not discouraging you to look for one by any means, but just know that learning on your own can be equally as effective.
I can see your point my friend!And i agree that there is all you need out there (after all music theory is relatively small and for every technique there is at least a dozen of DVDs available).But that doesnt mean that one should discard the option of a good teacher.In my opinion a student should be aware of all this educational material that is available but still needs someone to guide him/her through this chaos of books, DVD's etc.Also, consider a 10-15 year old kid.Do you think such a kid can actually be self taught?Kids at that age are easily impressed by things that may not turn to be that impressive after some years.A good teacher can also hear you playing and can tell you a prof. opinion.DVD's cant!

Also the fact that you (and some others as well) reached an advanced level of playing being self taught , doesnt mean that this is the rule.In addidtion, a good teacher (even a self taught one!) has made this 'journey' long before the student and can deffinitely tell him/her what to avoid and what to insist on studying.A teacher is a person that has learned from experience through years and years of playing.

Of course we can debate on what is a good teacher and how many of them are available in someone's city/town...

I dont want to persuade you about this, you have your opinion which i respect but consider these things i said and tell me what you think
Your points are indeed valid...I guess it comes down to the fact that some need more direction than others...I had natural talent and the ability to learn fast from the get-go, but it certainly doesn't mean that the method that worked for me will work for every player. Finding a good teacher can be quite daunting though, based on my own experience...
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burnt out
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dthodoris wrote:
burnt out wrote:
More questions and more answers are another step.

No sense in getting ahead of the current step one is on.

:roll:
Sorry my friend but i disagree with that! Knowing the next steps is very important especially in situations where you get tired of studying something and you wonder 'whats the point ??' Somebody should know his goals, and how the steps he needs to take are helping towards them.

**Sorry but my english kind of sucks :lol:
I'm not telling him/her not to learn it. I just said it's the next step.

Stop smoking fucking crack. You're too high strung and paranoid.
dthodoris
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burnt out wrote:
I'm not telling him/her not to learn it. I just said it's the next step.

Stop smoking fucking crack. You're too high strung and paranoid.
Start smoking crack.It will help you understand that the whole world doesnt necessarily share your opinions :)
Svelt Pen
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"stop smoking crack" from a guy called 'burnt out'. Oh, the irony! :lol: Chill out, dude.
Stephen Brown
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"Cough"

What about crack the modes.
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