Book with all chords!!!"

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-yasi-
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Hey,
i just was working wiht steve's 10 hour workout. At the chord part he said "buy a book with all chords there are".
i wanna buy one now, do you know any good book which has all chords there are existing in it??

thx!
seljer
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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/089898 ... WBI7TPWBZI

Not really a reference of guitar chords in 93529841994761 different variations but its got much much more other information on chords in there
tenstrings
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To be honest, chord dictionaries can become a bit of a crutch. Yes, they're useful as a starting reference while you grow as a musician, but I believe it's much more important to learn how to build your own chords from the theory. You'll find that it improves they way you think about music: once you understand the arpeggios that constitute any chord, your soloing will be much richer as well.

Let me recommend a couple of books as a starter:

- The Guitar Case Chord Book by Peter Picklow
- The Advanced Guitar Case Chord Book by Askold Buk

You might also want to get Understanding Chord Progressions for Guitar by Arnie Berle.

They're all relatively inexpensive.

J
spanishphrygian
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I think that Adam Kadmon's Guitar Grimoire series book called Chords and Voicings is the best. You can find it anywhere on the web, or at Amazon you know.
auralperception
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Not a book, but it will help.

http://jguitar.com/chorddictionary.jsp
It contains all voicings of the "regular" chords.


As for all chords that are possible, it depends on how you approach the guitar. Will you use 1 hand or 2 hands for the chords? Both have advantages and disadvantages when it comes to harmonization.
Here we go..

Code: Select all

You can maximally put 4 fingers on the fretboard. The spanwidth is 7 frets plus the x fret. That give the possiblity of 8 notes on 4 strings. For the other strings you can either do an X or a flatfinger. 
So this gives   6( 8^4 + 2 * 2 ) = 24600 chords. 
6 because the order does matter.  On a 7 string there are more chords possible ofcourse.


Now lets say you will 8 finger tap. You can play all the notes of the octave with 2 hands (I believe). 
If you will play no repition of notes you have the possibilities (12!-6!) = 12*11*10*9*8*7  = a lot
with repeation even more.

Well nice stuff.. but how do we apply all this in music?
What is much more interesting, is which chords you can get from a certain scale. It's rather unsual, but you can create very beautifull chords. 
Lets say we have an B minor scale (B C# D E F# G A B)
Musically speaking you can play 7^6  = 823543 chords.
This is including hearing the same note again and that your fingers are 24cm long. Otherwise you can play 7*6*5*4*3*2 chords.
Well very, great, but still don't know where to put the fingers.
I find an easier way to start figuring out is taking a certain mode of the scale. Lets say Dorian, and start finding harmonizations in there.
Keep in mind, that if you use distortion, some of the chords get very strange sound. Sometimes its more beautifull without distortion, depending on opinion and what you are using it for.

Also, learn all the "normal" chords and arpeggios. You can either sit like a robot and put them all in the brain, or learn music that has these chords in it, and transpose it to different keys. I find that Jazz music has a LOT of different chords. For example the standard Autumn leaves has 9th, Major/Minor 7th, m7b5 chord and some other.

Anyway, all this talking.. doesn't get you so far. Just grab the guitar and practice :!: :twisted:
MarkRobinson
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It would be far more benificial to learn how chords are constructed and become profficient in the application of your knowledge on the guitar. Guthrie's first book is a good one for this I seem to remember...
j3
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-yasi- wrote:Hey,
i just was working wiht steve's 10 hour workout. At the chord part he said "buy a book with all chords there are".
i wanna buy one now, do you know any good book which has all chords there are existing in it??

thx!
Chord dictionaries are IMO a total waste of time. It's much better to know the theory of how chords are made.

However, one book I've found to be immensely helpful is the book 'Modern Chord Progressions' by Ted Green. The reason I like this book so much is because it provides a perfect framework for learning new chord voicings in an application-based manual. I practice my Giuliani RH studies (picking patterns) while running though progressions. This way, you get your mechanical practice of RH patterns in at the same time you are exposed to the way voices move in standard chord progressions. Not only that, TG has some ridiculous stretches in some of his voicings that really give your LH a workout. When it comes time to play rhythm to progressions in a Realbook, you'll have an arsenal of logical voicings with smooth movement and lots of RH patterns which you can successfully execute when the '4-to-a-bar' Freddie Green stuff get's old. I have also noticed that this type of practice as improved my improvisation in that I more easily recognize the changes as they are going by without concentrating so much on the lead sheets.
Another book I used to use in a similar manner was Ronny Lee's Jazz Vol II. I went through the book practicing RH strumming rhythms from a colum in Guitar player (Feb '96) called 'Aint that a Groove'.
Finally, having chords indexed in progressions rather than here's 37 6/9 chords fashion offers one the opportunity to practice coming up with walking baselines, which is an extremely useful skill during rehearsal with less than a full band.
Brent.Young
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Download the back to Basics PDF files
http://www.daveweiner.com/rotw.html

April 2006 Viewers Choice:Back to Basics
Download the PDF's that are attactched and it tells you all about chord formations and says not to get the 1000 chord books and stuff but basically gets you learning how to work out different chord formations yourself, It helped me out alot.
Bold_As_Love
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spanishphrygian wrote:I think that Adam Kadmon's Guitar Grimoire series book called Chords and Voicings is the best. You can find it anywhere on the web, or at Amazon you know.
This book sucks balls. I have it, don't buy it. It's worthless as it only provides partial voicings most chords. For example he listed a C major chord with no 3rd. That's a C five.

Chord Chemistry is the book everybody talks about, not this putz Adam Kadmon.

Besides chord books are really only helpful if you learn one or two chords a day, otherwise its just too much and you lose most of them. Come up with your own voicings, they stick with you better.
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