i am so annoyed with how much theory there is

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leigh01
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i am so annoyed with how much theory there is

#1 Post by leigh01 » Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:52 am

has anybody noticed how you think youv just got the hang of something like the modes then someone asks you to do something with them then your like a what did u say its so annoying or the way someone explains it differently to u :roll:

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#2 Post by Zeds.Ded » Fri Dec 08, 2006 3:43 pm

thats the thing about thoery websites, it shows you how to do them one way and then another on a different webby!

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#3 Post by Ken Burtch » Sat Dec 09, 2006 12:58 am

I've learned to treat music theory like speaking English. I can spell pretty damn well, my grammar is mediocre, and I certainly don't know every word in the dictionary. The good news is I have no desire to. I have my favorite keys and modes, and the others I use if I stumble across something cool.

Music Theory is as complex or simple as you want it to be. There are people who must know everything about everything, and there are people who have a favorite key and mode and pretty much stick to it.

The best advice I can give is to ask questions in a forum such as this if you have confusion on an issue. I can pretty much guarantee that if someone posts bogus info at least 5 other people will correct him/her in short order and you'll get the right information pretty damn quick.

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#4 Post by Zeds.Ded » Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:43 am

very well said, i think along them lines too, thats why im not so pushed :)

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#5 Post by leigh01 » Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:51 am

he sounds like he knows his stuff doesnt he 8)

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Ricardo
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#6 Post by Ricardo » Wed Dec 13, 2006 5:06 pm

All music theory can be grasped by understanding this diagram thoroughly:

http://www.carolinaclassical.com/scales/circle2.jpg

So don't get overwhelmed, it is all based on 5ths intervals and relations. It is easy.

Ricardo

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#7 Post by leigh01 » Thu Dec 14, 2006 6:25 am

Ricardo wrote:All music theory can be grasped by understanding this diagram thoroughly:



So don't get overwhelmed, it is all based on 5ths intervals and relations. It is easy.

Ricardo
Thats just the circle of fifth's, with a bit more explanation, thanx for the advice but im happy with my knowledge now dude,

thank's everyone forthe advice it's all good. :)

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#8 Post by joelcornell » Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:35 pm

I think it is important to realize why there exists music theory...it more or less is a system of rules to dictate what a bunch of people think sounds good. At some point, people realized that a chord built off of the fifth scale degree sounded good as a resolution to the first scale degree, so now we have the 5-1 progression. Then they figured out it sounds better if you have them both in root position with the root on top of the 1, so you have a Perfect Authentic Cadence. People realized that if you play a C, an E, and a G, that you can use a scale consisting of a C,D,E,F,G,A,B to play over it and it will in general sound good...in general, theory is just what a bunch of people like to hear.

In a similar light, theory from other countries was created in the same way. Using whatever system of notes they had, they created scales that sounded good to them. They used meters that they felt had natural feels (the same reason why we use 4/4 time more than 11/8 ).

If you are learning theory, you must keep this in mind. If you are obsessing over learning all the different rules, always remember WHY they exist. I personally don't see much reason to learning theory for the sake of learning theory. When you realize its purpose, it becomes more important, but learning a bunch of Indian scales or Japanese scales and then putting them in a song because they aren't part of the diatonic scale is stupid if that is the reason you are doing it. If you want to create an Indian feel or Japanese feel and what to know what notes will create that, then it's a different story.

This is just something to keep in mind...hope it helps!

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#9 Post by burnt out » Sat Dec 23, 2006 9:34 pm

nice 8)

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#10 Post by leigh01 » Sun Dec 24, 2006 2:33 pm

burnt out wrote:nice 8)
is that all you have to say, that's a brilliant new light on the subject,
thanks dude ill try to keep it in my head when the teacher's ask me to work out the key of a piece of music in staff notation with four flat's and one sharps. :)

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#11 Post by joelcornell » Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:33 pm

leigh01 wrote:
burnt out wrote:nice 8)
is that all you have to say, that's a brilliant new light on the subject,
thanks dude ill try to keep it in my head when the teacher's ask me to work out the key of a piece of music in staff notation with four flat's and one sharps. :)
Just keep in mind why your teacher is doing it (other than for a paycheck :D ). You are going to have to write in all keys if you want to become something in music, and to notate it you will have to use key signatures. Key signatures make music cleaner looking, and they organize the notes in a pretty significant way (pun intended...you have to say it maybe to get the pun). Once again, a functional purpose.

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#12 Post by *theanimal*05 » Mon Dec 25, 2006 2:10 am

If music was easy, then any idiot could do it.

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#13 Post by burnt out » Mon Dec 25, 2006 1:09 pm

leigh01 wrote:
burnt out wrote:nice 8)
is that all you have to say
Obviously that was all I had to say otherwise I would have said more.

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#14 Post by lydian2000 » Mon Dec 25, 2006 2:12 pm

burnt out wrote:
leigh01 wrote:
burnt out wrote:nice 8)
is that all you have to say
Obviously that was all I had to say otherwise I would have said more.
Obviously. :lol:

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#15 Post by joelcornell » Wed Dec 27, 2006 1:48 am

*theanimal*05 wrote:If music was easy, then any idiot could do it.
Any idiot could, just most choose not to. I've noticed that like 90% of what makes or breaks a musician is their commitment to the instrument. Talent is what separates the committed usually, but those that don't want to spend time playing even if they have talent aren't going to be able to compete with someone who practices consistently without as much talent.

But I see what you're saying, I just wanted to make that point.

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