i need some lydian scales!

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jemgirl
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anyone can give me some?
thanx in advance,
patricia :wink:
trippy_hippy
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When I started learning the modes, I found it easier to learn a basic position for each mode, and then learn how to string them together (just like learning the box shapes for the pentatonic scales). For example, the scales for the modes in C major:
C Ionian:
e|----------------------------------------8--|
B|---------------------------------8-10-----|
G|------------------------7-9-10-----------|
D|----------------7-9-10-------------------|
A|--------7-8-10---------------------------|
E|-8--10------------------------------------|

D Dorian:
e|----------------------------------------------------10-|
B|----------------------------------------10-12-13-----|
G|------------------------------9-10-12----------------|
D|--------------------9-10-12--------------------------|
A|------------10-12-------------------------------------|
E|-10-12-13---------------------------------------------|

E Phrygian:
e|-----------------------------------------------------12-|
B|------------------------------------------12-13-15----|
G|----------------------------------12-14----------------|
D|-----------------------12-14-15-----------------------|
A|------------12-14-15-----------------------------------|
E|-12-13-15----------------------------------------------|

F Lydian:
e|---------------------------------------------------12-13--|
B|---------------------------------------12-13-15----------|
G|-------------------------------12-14----------------------|
D|-------------------12-14-15------------------------------|
A|--------12-14-15-----------------------------------------|
E|-13-15----------------------------------------------------|

G Mixolydian
e|------------------------------------3--|
B|----------------------------3-5-6-----|
G|--------------------2-4-5-------------|
D|-------------2-3-5--------------------|
A|------2-3-5---------------------------|
E|-3-5-----------------------------------|

A Aeolian
e|------------------------------------5--|
B|----------------------------5-6-8-----|
G|--------------------4-5-7-------------|
D|---------------5-7--------------------|
A|--------5-7-8-------------------------|
E|-5-7-8--------------------------------|

B Locrian
e|------------------------------------------7----------------|
B|------------------------------------8-10-------------------|
G|---------------------------7-9-10-------------------------|
D|------------------7-9-10----------------------------------|
A|---------7-8-10-------------------------------------------|
E|-7-8-10---------------------------------------------------|

You'll notice all of these scales contain the notes C,D,E,F,G,A and B. Try playing the notes from these scales over a F pedal tone. Try and phrase it around the F note, and you should be able to get the F Lydian sound (the big character note in the Lydian scale is the #4, so in this instance try to include the note B a fair bit).
You can do this using any of the tones as a pedal note, e.g., play notes from these scales using G as a pedal tone to try and bring out the mixolydian sound. After using pedal tones to get the sound you want try playing over chord sequences.
I probably haven't explained this very well, so if I haven't just say so and someone around here will probably be able to answer you a little better.
Tom
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jemgirl
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ahhhhh thank you soooo much trippy :P :P
this will help me further!
ones again thnx :wink:

peace,
patricia
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b2
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I just remember two by name:
The Lydian: 1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7
The Lydian Dominant: 1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, b7

The #4 is very much the sound of the Lydian mode

Hmmm.. what do you really want?
To learn and be able to improvise with the "lydian sound"
or just a lot of different "lydian scales"?

The first is most important, learn the lydian sound and be able
to bring it in when you improvise. Find chord changes that just scream
out for solos in lydian mode. You could borrow some from Mr. Vai :wink:

I very much like "K'm-Pee-Du-Wee". Just learn the main melody.
It is very much Lydian.
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jemgirl
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yeah b2, the bottomline is...i wanna improvise a little better (as i do now) with the lydian scale.
guitar_man_6
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Hi jemgirl,

The modes are merely a way of playing the major scale to suit the harmony of a specific piece or accompaniment. Always remember, the key (pun?) is in how the melody relates to the harmony, not how the melody relates to itself. With this in mind, make sure that you spend some of your modal studies playing to a backing track or with another guitarist, as an unaccompanied lick that uses the Lydian mode will not give the '#4' the prominence it needs to be create the Lydian sound.

When you are playing over a chord, the chord tones should be thought of as the safe notes. These are the notes that will always sound good, but may become boring and mechanical after a while. They're great notes to use if you want a solo where you hit the "right" note a lot, but if you want to create tension and maintain audience attention, you'll need to somewhat alter your note choice. Joe Satriani thinks of the chord tones as the four "given notes" but uses the other available notes in the current mode to add flavour to his solos.

For example, if you were soloing over an Amaj7, it would be advisable to use mostly chord tones (A, C#, E and G#) but add in some extra notes for spice.

Therefore, there are a few different combinations of notes that you can use. You could play it safe (providing this is the I chord) and opt for the leftover notes of the A major scale (B, D and F#). Alternatively, you make an exotic choice and opt for the chaotic sound of the half-whole diminished scale (A, Bb, C, C#, D#, E, F#, G, A). If you raised the G by a half-step, you would be left with an interesting-sounding, but not particularly melodic scale that could be used sparingly.

However, the Lydian mode works in between these two. It can be used as a substitute for the major scale but have its 'D#' ameliorated to enhance the musical interest of the piece. One interesting application of the Lydian mode is to omit the augmented fourth entirely until later in the solo, when its jagged edge will clash interestingly with the 5th in the chord.

Of course, the Lydian mode also rests comfortable in its traditional role over the IV chord, especially in compositions with liberal use of the IV-V cadence.

Now for scales:

I used to practice scales as shapes along to metronome...until I realised I wasn't making music. Scale patterns provide an excellent lifeline for sticky situations, but should be treated with caution because they limited your command over the fretboard, a problem made particularly evident during arpeggio movement, in which large position shifts are often neccesary to reach distant chord tones.

To improve my knowledge of the fretboard, I learnt the modes on the piano, and then applied this knowledge to a single string on my guitar. The major scale, with its step pattern of WWHWWWH provides an excellent basis for this process, as, by simply changing a note or two, it can be easily transformed into something far more exotic. Practice playing your major scale up a single string with the raised 4th, with legato slides if you're feeling Vai-ish - I'm sure you'll hear the influence straight away.

The next step it to memorise the relationships between strings, and then put these relationships into practice. Learn how to play a scale up one string, and then change strings at the 6th degree...then the 4th...then the 13th (and so on) - this will greatly increase your fretboard expansion. Finally, cover the entire fretboard.

I found that this method (though it takes considerably longer) prevents your fingers from becoming too set in their ways and allowed me to appreciate the layout of notes in the musical scale much better. Try these exercise yourself, and the approach to improvising I mentioned, and tell me what you think.


You might already know all this, but what the hell...


guitarman6
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Ricardo
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Sometimes doing fragments of the scale is better than running entire scales, or even doing arpeggios.

C lydian

E-12-8-------------------------------------
B--------12-8------------------------------
G---------------11-9-----------------------
D----------------------10-9---------------
A-----------------------------10-9---------
E------------------------------------12-8--

A lydian

E---------------------------9-11-12-9--------
B-----------------------10---------------10--
G------------------8-9-------------------------
D---------------11------------------------------
A------6-7-12----------------------------------
E-5-9-------------------------------------------

OR

E-----------------------------7-11-12-7-------
B------------------------10----------------10--
G-------------------8-9--------------------------
D----------------9--------------------------------
A-------6-7-12----------------------------------
E-5-7--------------------------------------------

E lydian

E-7-6---------6-------9-6---------6-------
B------9-5-7----9-5-------9-5-7-----9-5-
G--------------------------------------------
D---------------------------------------------
A---------------------------------------------
E---------------------------------------------

Even the standard pentatonic can bring out lydian. Try this over Cmaj7#11 chord:

E-10-7--------------------------------
B--------10-7------------------------
G---------------9-7-------------------
D--------------------9-7-------------
A-------------------------9-7--------
E------------------------------10-7--

This combined with example 1 is a great for jamming in C lydian. But as mentioned above, you really need to hear all this AGAINST either a chord backing, or a vamp (2 chords alternating) or a bass drone. Also this stuff functions the same as mentioned, over the IV chord in a harmonic progression.

Just some ideas I use.

Ricardo
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jemgirl
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thank you ricardo and guitar_man for the wonderful response!
thank you all people :wink:
its bin a help!!!
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Big Bad Bill
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How about this movable 3nps shape:

e|----------------------------------------------7-9-11------
B|------------------------------------7-9-10---------------
G|---------------------------6-8-9-------------------------
D|------------------6-7-9----------------------------------
A|---------6-7-9-------------------------------------------
E|-5-7-9---------------------------------------------------
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jemgirl
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thank you b.b.b.
i`m more than happy now. :P
spanishphrygian
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You will love the LydianDom scale hehe 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7 8.
Tris
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I Love you all

:shock:
Tris
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oops, and... I'm learning so much on this forum, it's ridiculous really.
Spooky_tom
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A nice little "trick" or tool is to play a minor 7 arpeggio or pentatonic scale a semitone below the tonic of the chord.
Example: The chord is Cmaj7 and you want to play a lydian line over it. Play the Bm7 arpeggio instead of the whole scale. The arpeggio gives you these notes: B(1), D(b3), F#(5), A(b7). Played over the Cmaj7 chord you hear these extensions: B(maj7), D(9), F#(#11), A(13).
The same thing with the Bminor pentatonic scale except now you also play the note E. Over the Cmaj7 chord this note functions as the major 3.

This two options often sound more "open" compared to the whole lydian mode.
Last edited by Spooky_tom on Tue Oct 31, 2006 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
spanishphrygian
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Lydian Augmented: 1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7
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