Pitch Axis : Simply Explained

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Bold_As_Love
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Pitch Axis is . . .

Same key, different mode.

That's it. Simple concept fancy name.

Love, Ryan.
shredlord
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Aah, that's how I understood it, too.

But it's more difficult to get it nice sounding ^^
Cozi101
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Same root note, different mode. It uses the root's Pitch as an axis to change to different modes.
Cleggy
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Lol :lol: No disrespect but I find that really funny how you made an effort to inform us of something that was simple and got it completely wrong. Please dont hate me.
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lydian2000
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Bold_As_Love wrote:Pitch Axis is . . .

Same key, different mode.

That's it. Simple concept fancy name.

Love, Ryan.
nothing to add. :D

" a momentray lapse of reason, when evrything suddenly makes sense and takes its due place..."
vinccenzzo
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Bold_As_Love wrote:Pitch Axis is . . .

Same key, different mode.

That's it. Simple concept fancy name.

Love, Ryan.
You sure don't stay in the same key, and that's the whole point.

You use chords, scales or modes from different keys but you will need to have at least one common tone that you will use as a root.

Example: A dorian (key of G), A aeolian (Key of C), A phrygian (key of F), A harmonic minor (key of A minor with the 7th degree sharped)
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lydian2000
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vinccenzzo wrote:
Bold_As_Love wrote:Pitch Axis is . . .

Same key, different mode.

That's it. Simple concept fancy name.

Love, Ryan.
You sure don't stay in the same key, and that's the whole point.

You use chords, scales or modes from different keys but you will need to have at least one common tone that you will use as a root.

Example: A dorian (key of G), A aeolian (Key of C), A phrygian (key of F), A harmonic minor (key of A minor with the 7th degree sharped)
here we go again... :roll: ...right in the same KEY of A, right?...oh but no, joe is a genius that came up with this concept that no other musician would have thought about before? the thread said SIMPLY explained.
Balex the Shizzle
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nah, actually what he was getting at is that it isnt in the same key, its just modes with the same root, which arent in the same key, A dorian and A phygrian have different keys but the same root, thats the point of pitch axis, it has an 'axis' of a certain note ('pitch')
johnny boy
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Here's a video of Satch teaching it at some clinic or something

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WrAA-MPDJM0& ... i%20lesson
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lydian2000
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Balex the Shizzle wrote:nah, actually what he was getting at is that it isnt in the same key, its just modes with the same root, which arent in the same key, A dorian and A phygrian have different keys but the same root, thats the point of pitch axis, it has an 'axis' of a certain note ('pitch')
lol...re-read what i just wrote, does it contradict your argument? no.
the thing is to treat these modes/chords as if they all belonged to the KEY of A i will repeat again AS IF....as said above, simple concept fancy name.
:roll:
vinccenzzo
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here we go again... :roll: ...right in the same KEY of A, right?
I think you're getting confused between roots and keys. If you replace "in the same key" by "with the same root" then I agree with you :)
...oh but no, joe is a genius that came up with this concept that no other musician would have thought about before? the thread said SIMPLY explained.
Not sure what you mean but Satch didn't invent pitch axis
vinccenzzo
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and to make it even more confusing, I think(not sure) that your chords/scales/modes don't need to have the same root, but one common tone.
Example: E minor (E,G,B), Eb Major (Eb,G,Bb)
They have G in common, so G is the pitch axis, but is not played as a root.

Emin can be found in the keys of D, C, G.
Eb Major can be found in the keys of Db, B, Gb
MR4Y
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modes have their OWN HARMONIC FIELDS. so you have to change the harmonic field to proper chords to match the mode. not telling that the Pitch Axis don't work, just an advice:

an example at the key of C-

Ionian- Cmaj (natural major scale)
Dorian- Cm, mostly used Cm7 or Cm7/9
Frigian- Cm
Lydian- Cmaj, mostly used C7+ or C7+/9
Mixolydian- Cmaj
Aeolian- Cm
Locrian- Cm7/5-
vinccenzzo
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MR4Y wrote:modes have their OWN HARMONIC FIELDS. so you have to change the harmonic field to proper chords to match the mode. not telling that the Pitch Axis don't work, just an advice:

an example at the key of C-

Ionian- Cmaj (natural major scale)
Dorian- Cm, mostly used Cm7 or Cm7/9
Frigian- Cm
Lydian- Cmaj, mostly used C7+ or C7+/9
Mixolydian- Cmaj
Aeolian- Cm
Locrian- Cm7/5-
Can you please define "harmonic field" for me ?
MR4Y
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vinccenzzo wrote:
MR4Y wrote:modes have their OWN HARMONIC FIELDS. so you have to change the harmonic field to proper chords to match the mode. not telling that the Pitch Axis don't work, just an advice:

an example at the key of C-

Ionian- Cmaj (natural major scale)
Dorian- Cm, mostly used Cm7 or Cm7/9
Frigian- Cm
Lydian- Cmaj, mostly used C7+ or C7+/9
Mixolydian- Cmaj
Aeolian- Cm
Locrian- Cm7/5-
Can you please define "harmonic field" for me ?
the harmonic field is the chords that are on a scale, for example, lets take the C major that have no accidents:

C D E F G A B

ok, since the scale are major, the root is gonna be major too and we will count on thirds to determine if the other chors are major minor, etc... so you'll finish with this

Cmaj Dm Em Fmaj G Am Bm7/5-(half diminished)

soif one song have two or more of this chords showed here, it's in C major because, there are some chords of the field on the song. anyway, adding 7th's on the order produces the same result:

C7+ Dm7 Em7 F7+ G7 Am7 Bm7/5-¹

¹- the half dimished chord already have a 7th, so you don't need to add one.
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