Perfect Pitch

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The Prez
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Perfect Pitch

#1 Post by The Prez » Fri Jul 18, 2003 12:45 pm

I've gotten the Perfect Pitch Ear Training Supercourse by David Berge. It's helped somewhat, but I'm stuck on the parts where you use relitive pitch with the A chord and the notes. If anyone has used this training and knows how to help, please comment. As, since were discussing Perfect Pitch, does Vai have it? (I'm pretty sure he does)

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#2 Post by RAI » Fri Jul 18, 2003 4:34 pm

Yes he does, and I believe he claims that it was something he wasn't born with, but actually practiced until he got it.......
:(
Wish I could do that.

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#3 Post by shader » Fri Jul 18, 2003 7:27 pm

It just takes time... In the past 6 months i've quadrupled my nearness to "Perfect Pitch"

(With that said, i still suck and can't distinguish between a minor 2nd and a major 3rd)

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#4 Post by RAI » Fri Jul 18, 2003 7:40 pm

shader wrote:It just takes time... In the past 6 months i've quadrupled my nearness to "Perfect Pitch"

(With that said, i still suck and can't distinguish between a minor 2nd and a major 3rd)


????????????

Well, I have Relative Pitch, but I just cannot understand how you can hear the difference between a perfect A, or a note that slightly sharp/flat.
I mean, I can hear something being out of tune, but which note is right, and which is wrong?

And when you have perfect pitch, doesn't it drive you mad when you walk around, and you hear all the sounds of every day life, and you can identify the pitch of everything, as well as something being slightly "off"???

I would probably go nuts!

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#5 Post by Viper » Fri Jul 18, 2003 11:58 pm

RAI wrote:
shader wrote:It just takes time... In the past 6 months i've quadrupled my nearness to "Perfect Pitch"

(With that said, i still suck and can't distinguish between a minor 2nd and a major 3rd)


????????????

Well, I have Relative Pitch, but I just cannot understand how you can hear the difference between a perfect A, or a note that slightly sharp/flat.
I mean, I can hear something being out of tune, but which note is right, and which is wrong?

And when you have perfect pitch, doesn't it drive you mad when you walk around, and you hear all the sounds of every day life, and you can identify the pitch of everything, as well as something being slightly "off"???

I would probably go nuts!


Indeed perfect pitch is much a curse as it is a blessing.
My grandmother (who sadly passed away a few months ago) had perfect pitch and she could not stand it when she heard music that was slightly off.

This made her schooldays in a choir a living nightmare (choirs tend to be bad for improving your pitch as everyone is usualls slightly off 1 or 2 degrees) as people would often be slightly off, and while the others tended to adjust to that frequency, she just could not, she couldn't force herself to sing out of tune.

I'd quite like to try that perfect pitch training course, so if anyone here has used it I'd quite like to hear their stories.

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#6 Post by Zebula77 » Sat Jul 19, 2003 2:48 am

I'm far from having perfect pitch, but I have good ear-memory (if you can call it that). For example, I know that 'Shine on you crazy diamond' starts with a G minor chord. So, if you ask me to sing a G, I can do that just be thinking about that song. And my memory is alawys correct, funnily enough. Also, I can use this memory to sometimes immediately identify notes that I hear, by linking them to songs that I know (and which key they're in).

Now of course, this doesn't always work. It's not as if someone just plays a note on the piano and I can identify it right away. I mean, I can if I remember a song where that note is the key, but sometimes I have to sort of think about it for a while, but I usually figure it out after a while.

It's useful, but of course not as useful as perfect pitch would be, and of course I can't hear it if something is slightly off.

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#7 Post by Tony » Sat Jul 19, 2003 6:44 am

Sometimes this works for me, too.
(and SOYCD is one of the greatest songs ever...)

There are people who claim that perfect pitch can NOT be learned, so:
Either you're born with it, or you'll never have it.
But if there is a way to get it...how do I do this?
Listen to a C until I can't anymore?

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#8 Post by smj » Sat Jul 19, 2003 9:18 am

Hi all,

I have pretty good relative pitch....and I really couldn't care less about having perfect pitch. As far as I'm concerned, having strong relative pitch (which is learned and developed) is far more useful. I'm not saying that perfect pitch doesn't have benefits (I'd never have to pay for another tuner again...or battery replacements) but I would still rather have better relative pitch.

Hearing modes and scales is all about relative pitch anyway. Hearing the relationship between one note or chord in relationship to the tonal center is what gives a mode/scale it's characteristic sound. I'm far more interested in hearing the overall colours of a song rather than hearing each note/chord independently. If you do hear each note/chord by itself....you'll never be able to hear whether something's dorian or phrygian or whole tone or whatever. Hearing the intent of a musical idea is what I am mostly concerned with.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Sean Meredith-Jones

http://www.seanmeredithjones.com

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#9 Post by Jakan » Mon Jul 21, 2003 4:50 am

Hey RAI i dont think Steve would say something like that. Perfect Pitch is something u are born with or not. I never heard Steve has perfect pitch but i know that Yngwie has it.

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#10 Post by Sliver » Mon Jul 21, 2003 7:38 pm

if steve has it is because he developed it. but im pretty sure he has it. just listen to Track 7 on Alive in an ultra world disc 2. his soloing is very precise even though he throws some chords in there, wish i could play like that.
yngwie has it, i would love to have perfect pitch. that would rock.

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#11 Post by Jakan » Tue Jul 22, 2003 12:57 am

The thing is. U cant develop it without having the predisposition for it.

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#12 Post by Grandor » Tue Jul 22, 2003 1:17 am

I dont know if i have perfect or relative or what the difference is...
I know if something is not of the scale when it is played and i can match my lead guitar to someones singing notes and stuff like that.

I can go out of set scales i know and improvise and make it sound good.

As for intervals and stuff like that i have had some training in the area and if im not spot on im 1 note away. With chords im not as good for telling a Root or inversion... when it is played to me but im still good.
whats that?

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#13 Post by RAI » Tue Jul 22, 2003 5:42 am

Grandor wrote:I dont know if i have perfect or relative or what the difference is...


Perfect pitch means you could tell if a note is a C or a C# (or maybe even a semi tone above C), with no reference to anything else.

Relative pitch means you can differentiate between intervals.
If you're jamming along in a certain key, you might be able to know what note someone played, because you're already in that key, and you recognize the interval.

:)

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#14 Post by Reaper » Tue Jul 22, 2003 8:36 am

Sliver wrote:if steve has it is because he developed it. but im pretty sure he has it. just listen to Track 7 on Alive in an ultra world disc 2. his soloing is very precise even though he throws some chords in there, wish i could play like that.
yngwie has it, i would love to have perfect pitch. that would rock.


That doesn't mean he has perfect pitch, it means he has very good relative pitch and an awesome understanding of music theory.

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#15 Post by Grandor » Thu Jul 24, 2003 12:12 am

I must have good relative pitch

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