Absolute pitch

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guyver_dio
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#16 Post by guyver_dio » Wed Jun 06, 2007 4:27 am

in any case, the talent having been born with it or not needs to be exercised to some extent. If you've been able to get to the stage of being completely flawless and can state any note that is played off the top of your head without a reference I'd say you've deserved the right to say you have absolute pitch.

Here's a few threads on the topic already
http://vai.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1 ... fect+pitch
http://vai.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1 ... fect+pitch
http://vai.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2 ... fect+pitch
http://vai.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1 ... fect+pitch
http://vai.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=9 ... fect+pitch

enjoy, also if you need more just try the search, there's a tonne of them :wink:

saraht
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#17 Post by saraht » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:16 am

acoates wrote:
saraht wrote:What do you mean 'how the hell would they know?' Who the hell are you? :roll: No need to get defensive!

If you must know, I believe it's because someone can say to them to sing a certain note and they can sing it straight away. And apparently, not everyone has the ability to be able to do that or something. And no Big Bad Bill, I've never 'tested either of them' because I don't really care, to be honest! :lol:
I'm not concerned about how they know they have perfect pitch, of course they would know that, more the statement that they somehow are aware of it being something no one who isn't born with it can obtain just because they have it themselves. Of course not everyone can do it, most would require extensive musical training to get to that level.
saraht wrote: Yes but surely by definition, those on the lower end of the scale do not have perfect pitch. You can't have a 'sliding scale' of perfection!


Oh come on if you can't work out that I was talking about a scale of the ear's ability to identify notes that goes from total tone-deaf upwards then you really need to use your noggin a bit more.
Oh my God, what is wrong with you??? I wish I hadn't bothered commenting on this topic now! I wasn't saying that they are correct in believing that perfect pitch can't be attained by those not born with it. That is why I said "THEY RECKON". I don't necesarily agree with that opinion either.

Yes I was aware that you were talking about a sliding scale from tone-deafness upwards. But the way you phrased it didn't make much sense, to me at least.

You obviously have a chip on your shoulder about not having perfect pitch or something. Otherwise why would you care so much about this topic?

Either that or you're just a complete tw*t. :|

EDIT: Sorry, that was uncalled for, you're not a complete tw*t. If I leave it at that it will only provoke you into saying something derogatory about me, and I really don't want to continue arguing with you about such a petty and inconsequential issue! :)

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#18 Post by guitarbonham » Fri Jun 08, 2007 8:44 pm

so ive done some research on this and what ive found is that no one can obtain perfect pitch your just born with it or your not, BUT with practice it is possible to get your relative pitch to a point where you can name any note. Steve vai does not have perfect pitch. people say he does but he has said that he does not. (or at least thats what i read i may be wrong) but anyway he memorized a note and based off of that can name any note and can sing any note right on. I've been working on this and on cue i can sing an A within half a step everytime, and this is after only a few weeks of working on it. i just don't have very good relative pitch so i cannot name any note. absolute pitch is different where people know what the notes are without comparing them to anything. like a car horn on the road they can name the pitch of it withtout even thinking. they also cannot listen to music that is tuned at a different tuning (some countries use 440 and some use 442) to listen to something just that little bit off is like us listening to an extremelly out of tune guitar. another thing is only about 1 in 10000 people is born with perfect pitch.

now all of this is just what i found i may be wrong... i just went through a period of interest in this subject.

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#19 Post by guyver_dio » Fri Jun 08, 2007 11:15 pm

I don't see how that's true, pitch is still pitch no matter what the tuning is, it wouldn't throw them off being able to name the notes being played if they actually did have perfect pitch.

Also the way I see it, perfect pitch only gives a person the ability to distinguish individual notes very very accurately, to be able to clearly hear the differences between any slight change in pitch. This doesn't mean a person with perfect pitch without any training can rattle off the names of notes, cause how would they have any idea a certain pitch is called a C or A or whatever. They'd still have to rely on memory to tell them which pitch is related to what name just like a person without perfect pitch would have to do except not having to train the ear to pick up on certain differences that makes a note sound the way it does. It's still a memory game no matter how you look at it.

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#20 Post by Big Bad Bill » Fri Jun 15, 2007 1:25 am

Absolute Pitch: Genetics and Perception

Jane Gitschier, Alexandra Athos, Barbara Levinson, Alan Bostrom, Nelson Freimer, Elizabeth Theusch, Jason Zemansky, and Amy Kistler

University of California, San Francisco, USA

Absolute pitch (AP), often referred to as perfect pitch, is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. This perceptual gift is distinguishable from relative pitch, a learned skill common in trained musicians, in which a pitch is rapidly derived by its interval from a reference pitch. The genesis of AP has been of interest to musicians, psychologists and neuroscientists, with recent studies supporting inborn anatomical and genetic, rather than experiential, underpinnings. We employed a Web-based survey and pitch-labeling test to recruit subjects with AP into our study on the genetic basis of absolute pitch. Here, we examine the wealth of perceptual data emanating from 981 individuals who meet our stringent criteria for AP. Our analysis revealed three striking phenomena: an age-dependent perceptual distortion of pitch in the sharp direction; note-naming irregularities suggestive of a perceptual magnet centered at the musical note “A”; and a bimodal distribution of pitch-naming ability, possibly implicating the influence of one or a few genes with large effects on this complex trait. These findings show that AP subjects offer a unique window into flexibility in auditory architecture and augur well for unraveling its genetic contribution.

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#21 Post by guitarbonham » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:45 am

well it is still memory but they memorize the pitches more by frequency then by sound. so if your playing an out of tune instrument thats still tuned correctly relativly then they still hear that and it sounds really bad to them. and they can't just immedietly name any note. after some musical training they can. but i assume that if they learned how to play on an instrument that was relativly tuned right but out of tune they would learn those frequencies instead of the standard frequencies.

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#22 Post by joshua202020 » Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:08 am

I'm in the PERFECT PITCH CLUB..

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atza
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Re: Absolute pitch

#23 Post by atza » Tue Mar 07, 2017 5:38 am

This topic had a good run :)

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Re:

#24 Post by JulianClark » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:55 am

guitarbonham wrote:well it is still memory but they memorize the pitches more by frequency then by sound. so if your playing an out of tune instrument thats still tuned correctly relativly then they still hear that and it sounds really bad to them. and they can't just immedietly name any note. after some musical training they can. but i assume that if they learned grandcraps.co.uk on an instrument that was relativly tuned right but out of tune they would learn those frequencies instead of the standard frequencies.
My thoughts exactly!

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guitartunings
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Re: Absolute pitch

#25 Post by guitartunings » Tue Nov 13, 2018 12:15 am

Unfortunately, you can't really develop perfect pitch. It's either something you have or don't have. You are born with it. Otherwise, we'd all have it. I know I practice enough to have gotten it by now. :lol:

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