Ice 9

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mental speedin
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Hi, as some of you may have seen, i put a thread up about erotic nightmares to find out info on it for an essay i am doing on it. in this essay i also talk about Ice 9 by Satch. Does anyone have any info on the song such as background notes etc.
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lydian7
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Ice-Nine - A crystalline form of water so stable it never melts.. The song was based on a novel called The Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut. I suggest you read the book to better understand the meaning behind the song. :)
mental speedin
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yeah i knew about the book but i didnt know readin it would help lol i thot satch just got a little idea for a song n went for it lol
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guyver_dio
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These are the Performance Notes taken from the Surfin With An Alien Tabulare Book.

This sinister-sounding theme, inspired by a substance in Kurt Vonnegut's "Cat's Cradle" which crystalizes water on contact, begins with two accented intervals (a perfect 5th to a major 3rd) providing some initial contrary motion before settling into a two-bar pumping rythem figure using root-5th chords in parallel motion. Four bars later, the "ice chords" enter (Fill 1) and the mood is set for the appearance of the melody another four bars later. This melody owes much to Jimi Hendrix in both its phrasing and content. It is stated twice before moving to its first variation, an eight-bar figure liberally sprinkled with artificial harmonics and quater-tone bends. These short one-bar statements are answered by a chiming funky chordal figure which is in turn answered by the "ice chords" (Fill 2). Leading out of this section is a descending sixteenth note C# blues scale figure on bar 8 providing the transition to what could be called the "Chorus". This eight bar section contains a theme played in three octaves over a thick, syncopated rythem figure. Next, the melody is restated in three octaves followed by a one-bar drum break which leads into perhaps the album's most ferocious soloing, grouped into three distinct sections, each using drastically different tones and techniques. The first eight-bar solo cuts loose with an amazing flurry of thirty-seconds notes played with an extreme legato technique and brings to mind elements of Frank Zappa's soloing style. The Main Tonality here is Eb Dorian (derived from the Db major scale) with the addition of a flatted 5th for bluesiness. Bar 7 features a bent not combined with a trem. Bar upward pull, while bar 8 restates the same general idea three octaves lower.

Solo number two, also eight bars long, commences with what sounds like a heavily treble-filtered pick slide (filtered with a wah-wah pedal in fixed position), but could also be a series of harmonics produced by playing rapid triplet pull-offs on a single string with the left hand while simultaneously running the side of the right hand index finger back and forth along the length of the string between the bridge and the neck. Try 'em both; they're equally big fun. The wild "treble till you can't stand it" tone of this section yields some indescibable artificial harmonics in bars 3 and 4. There are two harmonics produced here that, as the string is bent, move in oppisite directions resulting in a ring modulation effect with no ring modulator in sight. Try "fishing" for these harmonics at carious points along the string length including on the fingerboard. This lick is surrounded by some rapid-fire thirty-second note lines based on Bb Dorian (key of Ab Major) again using many legato hammer-ons and pull-offs. In Bar 7, the note is raised in two distinct trem. bar pulls followed by an ever-widening whammy vibrato in bar 8.

Solo number three (also eight bars long) is the darndest thing I've ever heard. These are some noises Adrian Belew would be proud of! Using backward recorded guitars we begin with a sound that sounds like my car when i try to start it on cold damp days and continue through some harmonic squeals into three examples of what Joe has termed the "lizard down the throat" sound. This consists of raising a note by sliding it up the string and simultaneously lowering the whammy bar in an attempt to keep the pitch the same. The result is this other-worldly warble that backwards or forwards, sound great! A C#5 chord rises from the flubber and gives way to the D.S. of the melody. To hear what was played in real time in the third solo, you must somehow listen to this section of the song backwards. This is most easily accomplished by flipping the reels on a reel-to-reel tape recorder. After the return to the melody and variation we move into an elongated chorus, featuring the melody played in three octaves. The Outro Solo (Beginning in bar 3 of the Coda) is based on the C# blues scale. Statements phrased around the recycling chorus melody line are used to create tension. The Soloing becomes more instense and the spaces become fewer as "Ice Nine" slowly fades to audio black.



Not sure if this is the right information your looking for but thought it may help.
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b2
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"lizard down the throat" is a cool one :D
guyzif
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Careful of plagarism tho dude. Im sure your carful tho! You write that essay!
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