Stuck in the 80s

For discussion of all general music topics, Favored Nations artists, Vai-related musicians and all other artists and bands.
brainpolice
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Why are many "guitar music" fans stuck on 80s glam rock? It gets old watching people cling on to such cheesy, talentless music that was all about getting girls and getting drunk; and putting on a show instead of making good music; having crappy songs and then a fast guitar solo comes out of nowhere. And i don't think it's a matter of when you grew up. I grew up on the 90's grudge bands, and I don't like any of em. It seems people tend to cling on to whatever they grew up with, but without actually growing up themselves. I'm sure i'll get plenty of negative response to this, as every single guitar forum i've ever been on seems to be full of 30 something guys who still listen to Stryper. Sorry, i think it's time to grow up.
Among the usual responses to this question, people usually say that "all the great guitar players came from the 80's hair bands". Did they really? To me it sounds like a generation of people who tried to copy Eddie Van Halen, and mostly failed. A generation of players who forgot the roots of rock music, forgot about being creative, and just jumped on the bandwagon. Most of those players sound like they are chasing their own tales, and their tone was tiny and weak. Another thing about it that bothers me is that people consider it metal. I'm sorry but any real metalhead is going to laugh at you if you seriously think Winger is metal music. This music was nothing more then a cheesy, pop-induced cheap immition of metal. There is no metal in it, it's way too dripping with "pussyness" to be the slightest metal.
I find it funny when i see these people acting like bands nowadays don't show any talent and are substanceless, which is true, but what they fail to see is the 80's cock rock they hold on to is no different. 80s cheese/glam/whateveryouwannacallit bands we're no less based on image then Britney Spears. It's just a different context. Cheese is cheese, there's no difference between generations. And it always will be cheese. There comes a time when one should grow up and simply get over it. The 80's was not the time that all the great guitarists came out, rather it was the time that guitar playing (and rock music as a whole) greatly generalized itself. It's time to move on.
"The concept of the rock-guitar solo in the eightees has pretty much been reduced to: Weedly-weedly-wee, make a face, hold your guitar like it's your weenie, point it heavenward, and look like you're really doing something. Then, you get a big ovation while the the smoke bombs go off, and the motorized lights in your truss twirl around!" - FZ
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b2
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Not all people have the need to go into themself deeply to bring out
experimental music. People are so different...
Some just enjoy the life and takes everything very relaxed.
They dont have this need to be very creative and experimental.

Some people just love a cold beer, sex, money and party.
Other also have a need to be an artist and work hard to make the most
out of everything.

People are born with different brains and DNA's
so we will always be different :wink:

The "hair guitar music" from the 80's as I see it was much about
being tough. "Tough music"... and hairy men hehe
An excellent example would be the Rocky theme "Eye of the tiger".
That is "tough music".. typically 80's

I guess many people still like this "tough music" and dont have
any need for more "advance" music. Alot of people think
that playing guitar in a rock/heavy band is very tough..
And today all these new hard rock musicans with tattoo's and black
clothes... just an image maybe.. to make more money?

I guess my answer would be because most of the people dont have
the need to be experimental and very creative.
Many young men likes "tough music". You will not find many men in
the age 50 and above who love the "hair guitar music" from
the 80's :wink:
Viva La Revolucion
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There is no way I'm going to say that I like hair metal, but there are also some great bands who still seem tohave the hair metal label. Band like Mr. Big and Extreme have proven themselves to be acut higher than the rest both musically and lyrically. Also, Steve Vai himself started out in the slightly OTT and cheesy, yet funny DLR (hair)band, then moved on to the super commercial pumped up version of Whitesnake, before he finally left the commercial hard rock behind when he released Passion and Warfare.
Even though the rest of the hair bands had some amazing guitarists(George Lynch, Richie Sambora, John Norum and Warren deMartini), there were just too many EVH and Yngwie copycats around for the genre to be taken seriously.
GYPCMAN
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Look at Steve........he was one that was very experimental. And like Zappa didn't seem to conform to that days music........but then all of a sudden he lands a gig with the king of hair DLR and it was awesome!

2 DLR albums later he sets the world on fire with Passion and Warfare.

I believe what we had in the 80s was VanHalen starting something awesome and then everyone trying to follow suit. When Vai got with Roth, it was actually something very fresh.

There was a formula that the hair bands were trying to follow and like many others, I to got caught up a little.........but I'm one that had a blast back then and moved on. Not because I can't stand that music...no, it definitly had it's place in time, but because my musical interests are just different. I started out with the spanish fusion thing then got caught up and now I'm back with my 1st love.

Ya gotta admit.......as cheesy as some of it was, it was fun and back then that's what rocknroll was all about. :D
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Mr. Canadian
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brainpolice wrote:It seems people tend to cling on to whatever they grew up with, but without actually growing up themselves.
There is an easy explanation for this...

I think that there is a window of opportunity in which every generation absorbs most of its most important music and cultural cues - starting around 11 or 12 and ending around 22 or 23. Within that period, one is a member of one true leisure class - being a student.

There is time for music and the kind of shared listening experiences in which beliefs and associations about music become self-reinforcing and ultimately imprinted. Most people unquestioningly embrace whatever the music of the time might be; a few go off and find something on their own. But they do it within that window. Then after one's early 20s, other demands crowd into the time once spent absorbing music. So the intake mechanisms of youth shut down in favor of career, marriage, parenting, and so on - all more pressing and time consuming. The die of taste is cast forever. This is why everyone remains emotionally attached to the music of adolescence, convinced that he lived in some “golden age” and forever wonders why the new music of the moment is never as good as it used to be. They may be demonstrably right in some cases. But that's a different argument of musicology.
%thd
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Mr. C when did you become a psychologist. Man i am going to dumb my lousy excuse for doctor and just come see you.

Do you have a nice comfy sofa?
Do you take HMO/PPO?

all joking aside, well put.

%thd
brainpolice
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Thanks for the feedback without flaming people.
" You will not find many men in
the age 50 and above who love the "hair guitar music" from
the 80's "
Yea, you got a good point there. And my thought would be that most of those 50 year olds have the exact same complex about the 60's music they grew up with.
"it was fun and back then that's what rocknroll was all about."
True. But isn't rocknroll also about defying norms? non-conformity? see, this is where a problem arises for me, because I see most of those bands as really big conformists.
And Canadian, i think you're response was great. Really summed it up well, for all generations - on why they hold on to what they grew up with so dear. It makes alot of sense. Thanks for replying without hostility.
I think there are some amazing works of art from all generations. It just bothers me alot when people cling on to just 1, without appriciating what came before it, which it very well wouldn't exist without.
Youngshredder
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lol, Im one of the Metal heads who'll laugh in your face for saying those bands are metal.

Im stuck on 80's music too, but I listen to Allan Holdsworth (his solo career started in the 8o's), Van Halen, the Thrash Scene (didn't wanna name all the bands), Satch, Vai, Yngwie, so on. The only glam band I listen to is Motley Crue, and that's only for their first 2 albums and the "Dr. Feelgood" song, which kicks ass.
brainpolice
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Cool. "lol, Im one of the Metal heads who'll laugh in your face for saying those bands are metal." Thankyou for confirming that, cuz i'm sorry folks, bands like Poison do NOT qualify as metal in any way whatsoever. I agree when people say the best metal came from the 80s, but I disgree on what metal actually IS.
FINGERS76
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Is anyone else tired of the 'you should like what I like' threads.
DannyBoyVai
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while i am largely in agreement with you Alex bro . i have to state that music these days in the "rock" context at least is so very depressing and always seems to talk about suicide and death and other such petty bullshit . the 80's cock rock bands at least had a good time and made people happy with the cheese .

i still agree with you mostly . but i felt like pointing that out . at least the guitar playing in those bands was reasonable playing . theres nothing even resembling talent nowadays unless you consider bad vocals talent . or perhaps tuning to drop D so you can use 1 finger and play 3 chords over n over for every song you write ? you call that talent lol ? of course you dont .

it is time to grow up , but its also a time to remember the good points of the cock rock . it made people feel happy to be alive and made people wanna learn guitar . thats not a bad thing .... shame there was so many utter dickheads in those bands though huh hahaha
dzdncnfsd
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thank you fingers
GYPCMAN
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Great point Dannyboy!!
Vaituoso
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I grew up listening to Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and the like. It's 2005 and I'm still listening to Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and the like.
BaggedCereals
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the 80's was by far the best years of music! nothing beats it!
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